61st Georgia Volunteer Infantry
Confederate States of America (CSA)
A Regimental History
 
Information gathered by John Griffin
(updated 23 November 2003)

In honor and remembrance of the ancestors who served with this regiment, lest they be forgotten, this regimental history is dedicated to:

David H. Alderman, a third cousin three times removed was born in1847 in Brooks Co, GA, the son of William Alderman and Sarah Edmondson, enlisted as a private in Company C. David died of small pox at Guinea Station, VA in service to the CSA. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0001, 00002237

Henry D. Alderman, a third cousin three times removed was born on 2 June 1843 in Brooks Co, GA, the son of Timothy Alderman and Sarah Williams. Henry married Martha Mobley, daughter of George C. Mobley. Henry enlisted as a private in Company C 7 September 1861. He was wounded in left thigh. Later he was appointed 3rd Sergeant. Pension records show he was captured, date and place not given. Henry was released from prison at Elmira, NY April 1865, with a surrendered at Tallahassee, FL 10 May 1865. He was listed as paroled, Thomasville, GA 19 May 1865. Henry died in Colquitt Co, GA on 7 April 1905, he was 61. National Archives: 000226, 0001, 00002245

Isaac E. Alderman, a third cousin three times removed was born in1843 in Brooks Co, GA, the son of William Alderman and Sarah Edmondson. Isaac enlisted in Company C on 7 September 1861. He was captured at Spotsylvania, VA, 12 May 1864. He was transferred from Point Lookout, MD to Elmira, NY 25 July 1864 , and died there of pneumonia 20 December 1864, , he was 21. His grave is # 1074, Woodlawn National Cemetery. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0001, 00002247

William Alderman a third cousin three times removed was born in1840 in Brooks Co, GA, the son of William Alderman and Sarah Edmondson. William enlisted in Company C on 17 March 1862. He was killed in action at Rappahannock, VA 22 August 1862, he was 22. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0001, 00002279

Alderman George Washinigton Carlton, a fourth cousin two times removed was born on 16 November 1843 the son of William Carlton and Harriet Hendry. Alderman enlisted in Company C on 7 September 1861. His record is listed as Colter, Alderman (or Carlton) He died of pneumonia in Gainesville, GA hospital 23 October 1862, he was 18. A place of death also given was Brunswick, GA. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0010, 00002645

Thomas William Carlton, a fourth cousin two times removed was born on 16 February 1838 the son of William Carlton and Harriet Hendry. Thomas enlisted as a private in Copany C on 7 September 1861. His record is shown as: Colter, Thomas W. (Carlton). He was appointed 1st Corporal and later captured on 18 October 1864. Thomas died in hospital as POW in Rock Island prison, he was 25. . National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0010, 00002704

Jacob Clinton Clements was born in about 1838. He married (my second cousin three times removed) Winifred Wilcox, daughter of John Wilcox and Frances Lott. She was born 5 March 1840 in Ware Co, GA and died 29 May 1916 in Ware Co, GA. He served in Company A listed as 1st Corporal 27 August 1861 and later appointed 1st Sergeant. He was captured at Cedar Creek, VA 19 October 1864. Jacob is listed as paroled at Point Lookout, MD 18 February 1865. Received at Boulware & Cox's Wharves, James River, VA, 20-21 February 1865 and again paroled at Albany, GA. 22 May 1865. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0012, 00002567

Jacob Dorminy, a first cousin four times removed was born on 25 October 1838 in Irwin Co, GA, the son of John Bradford Dorminy and Eleanor Paulk. Jacob first married Rachel Roberts, daughter of Bryant J. Roberts and Wealthy Mathis. She died in 1866. On 15 August 1867 when Jacob was 28, he second married Susan Hunter , in Berrien Co, GA. Jacob served as a private enlisting in Company A on 27 August 1861and later serving as a Sergeant. He was detailed for hospital duty in 1864. According to the record he was captured at Strasburg (or Staunton), VA, 26 September 1864 and released at Point Lookout, MD 15 May 1865. Jacob died in Irwin Co, GA on 29 November 1910, he was 72. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0017, 00002940

Willis Dorminy, a first cousin four times removed was born on 12 October 1828 in Irwin Co, GA, the son of John Bradford Dorminy and Eleanor Paulk. On 12 January 1865 when Willis was 36, he married Rebecca A. McDuffie, daughter of Norman McDuffie & Sophronia Daniels, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born on 21 May 1840 and died in Ben Hill Co, GA in 1910. Willis first enlisted as a private in Company A 27 August 1861. He was elected junior 2nd Lieutenant 23 September 1862 and 2nd Lieutenant later. He resigned 17 March 1864. Willis died on 16 October 1897, he was 69. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: Not currently found.

Elbert G. Fletcher was born on 13 April 1839 in Irwin Co, GA the son of William Fletcher and Mary Ann Dorminy. On 10 February 1861 when Elbert was 21, he married (my second cousin three times removed) Catherine McMillan, daughter of John C. McMillan & Sarah "Sally" Paulk, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born on 29 October 1839 in Irwin Co, GA and died in Tift Co, GA on 4 November 1930. Elbert joined Company A as a private 27 August 1861. He was discharged 27 July 1862. He later enlisted as a private in Company B, 10th Battalion Georgia Infantry 30 July 1862. He was then wounded and permanently disabled at Petersburg, VA. 22 June 1864. He was listed as paroled at Albany, GA 22 May 1865. Elbert died on 10 February 1890, he was 50. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0021, 00000709, and 000226, 0021, 00000708

Wiley Gray a second cousin, 4 times removed was born in 1841 the son of Joshua K. Gray and Elizabeth Roberts. In November 1860 when Wiley was 19, he married Nancy Lord, in Berrien Co, GA. He Enlisted in Company A on 27 August 1861 as a private and is shown last as present on muster roll 4 November 1864. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0024, 00002205

Willis F. Gray was born about 1830 the son of Gibson Gray. On 9 October 1852 when Willis F. was 22, he married (my first cousin four times removed) Mary Ann Roberts, daughter of William Roberts & Nancy Tucker, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born in 1833. Willis enlisted in Company E on 10 July 1861. He was captured at Spotsylvania, VA 12 May 1864, and released at Point Lookout, MD in 1865. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: Not currently found.

Daniel D. Henderson, a first cousin 4 times removed was born on 9 July 1825 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Rev. John J. Henderson Sr. and Rhonda Whitley. On 7 October 1850 when Daniel was 25, he married Rebecca Tucker, my first cousin four times removed, daughter of Elisha Tucker & Zilpha Williams, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born on 15 March 1836 in Irwin Co, GA and died in May 1924. Daniel enlisted in Company A and is shown on the roll as a private 27 August 1861. He was killed in action at Sharpsburg MD on 17 September 1862, he was 37. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0028, 00001370

John Jackson Henderson Jr. a first cousin four times removed was born 27 August 1827 Irwin Co, GA the son of Rev. John J. Henderson Sr. and Rhonda Whitley. On 9 September 1850 when John was 23, he married Susannah "Susie" Whiddon, daughter of Lott Whiddon & Judith "Juda" Dorminy, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born on 25 April 1831. He enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company A, 26th Battalion Georgia Infantry on 27 Aug 1861. This regiment then became Company A, 61st Georgia Infantry also called "Irwin County Cowboys" He is found as a 2nd Lieutenant 27 August 1861and again elected 2nd Lieutenant 31 May 1862, 1st Lieutenant 17 September 1862 and Captain 1 October 1863. John was wounded in the mouth in fighting at Fredricksburg, VA. He was captured at Spotsylvania, VA 12 May 1864. John was used by the Federals as part of the "Immortal 600" which was a federal plan to use Confederate officers as human shields for Union forces. He was moved to Charleston, SC on 20 August 1864, to Fort Pulaski, GA on 21 October 1864, then to Hilton Head SC 19 November-February 1865. He was returned to Ft. Delaware and released on 16 June 1865, several months after the war ended. John Jackson died in Sycamore, GA in 1920, he was 92. Military: National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0028, 00001525

Robert H. Henderson a first cousin four times removed was born 12 February 1831in Irwin Co, GA the son of Rev. John J. Henderson Sr. and Rhonda Whitley. On 12 March 1857 when Robert was 26, he first married my first cousin three times removed Elizabeth "Lizzie" Paulk, daughter of John Paulk Sr. & Elizabeth Lott, in Coffee Co, GA. She was born on 26 March 1841 in Irwin Co, GA. and died in Round Mountain, Blanco Co, TX on 18 August 1890. About 1895 he second married Mattie Bowen. Robert enlisted as a private in Company A 17 May 1862. He was later appointed Sergeant. He is listed as surrendering at Appomattox, VA 9 April 1865. Robert died in Brookfield, GA on 15 January 1915, he was 83. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0028, 00001598

Joseph Columbus Luke was born 12 June 1840 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Joshua A. Luke and Nancy Tomberlin. On 12 March 1863 when Joseph was 22, he married (my second cousin three times removed) Sarah Jane Paulk, daughter of James K. Paulk & Elizabeth Hobby, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born on 11 October 1851 in Irwin Co, GA. Joseph enlisted in Company A as a private 31 October 1861. He was wounded and missing at Fredericksburg, VA 13 December 1862. Joseph died on 19 July 1885, he was 45. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0037, 00003429

William J. Matthews was born about 1830.  He married my second cousin four times removed Mary Willcox born 18 July 1831 in Irwin Co, GA, daughter of George Willcox and Sarah Daniel.  William was listed as a 1st Lieutenant January 1862 and then elected Captain on 31 May 1862. He was killed at Sharpsburg, MD 17 September 1862. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0039, 00000587

John B. McDuffie, a Great-Great-Great Uncle was born in 1817 in Jones Co, GA. the son of Duncan McDuffie and Sarah Bayne. John first married Bethia Busby who later died in 1846. John second married Elizabeth Young. John was appointed 1st Corporal of Company H, 10th Georgia Infantry 20 May 1861. He retired as Corporal 15 June 1861 and transferred to Company A, 61st Georgia Infantry 17 August 1861. John was appointed Quartermaster Sergeant 17 August 1862. He was captured at Crampton's Gap, MD. 4 July 1863. The record show him paroled at Fort Delaware, DE 20 July 1863 and transferred to City Point, VA for exchange on 1 August 1863. Returning to his regiment he surrendered at Appomattox, VA 9 April 1865. John died in 1875, he was 58. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0040, 00002162 and 000226, 0040, 00002163

Henry L. Brooks Paulk a first cousin four times removed was born about 1842 in Irwin Co, GA the son of John Paulk & Aunt Elizabeth Lott. About 1867 when Henry was 25, he married Frances "Fannie" Peterson (my second cousin three times removed), daughter of Henry "Hal" Petersoon & Martha "Patsy" Gaskins, in Coffee Co, GA. She was born in April 1845 in Telfair Co, GA. and died in Coffee Co, GA in March 1932.  Henry enlisted 27 August 186 as a private in Company A. On July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, he was carrying a battle flag sewn by his wife which she had made at their home place about 2 miles NE of present day Willachoochee, GA. During the battle, Henry’s dear friend Reuben Roundtree fell mortally wounded at this side. He passed the flag to William Watson so he could give assistance to Reuben. In the confusion, he lost track of Watson and his precious battle flag. Henry later died of snakebite on his home place in present day Atkinson Co. In "Trains of Misery, Lee’s Retreat from Gettysburg" by Kent Masterson Brown the following is extracted: Along the seam of a tattered Confederate battle flag was the inscription "captured at Monterey Gap". With the faded banner was card on which was penciled, in the handwriting of a Lt. Joseph Leslie of Co D, 18th PA Cavalry, the history of the battle flag. Leslie has captured the flag from the hands of a wounded Georgia soldier by the name of Watson during the Union attack upon Lee’s retreating trains of equipment, ordnance, supplies, and wounded soldiers at Monterey Gap, PA on 4 July 1863. Pvt. William Watson of Co A, 61st GA was wounded on 1 July near the Alms House north of Gettysburg and was captured by a division of Union Calvary under command of General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. Lt. Leslie saw the tattered banner and took it from Private Watson. William Watson died on 3 Aug 1863 at the Seminary Hospital, Hagerstown, MD a casualty of Gettysburg and Lee’s retreat from Pennsylvania. Pension records show Henry surrendered at Appomattox, Va. 9 April 1865 Henry L. Brooks died in Coffee Co, GA about 1899, he was 57. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0047, 00002256

Hiram L. Paulk, a first cousin four times removed was born in 1839 in Irwin Co, GA, the son of James Paulk Sr. and Faith, Akridge. On 11 November 1858 when Hiram was 19, he married Millie Fletcher, daughter of William Fletcher & Mary Ann "Polly" Dorminy, in Irwin Co, GA. She was born on 8 May 1839 in Irwin Co, GA. Hiram enlisted 27 August 1861 in Company A. He was appointed Sergeant and later wounded in arm at the battle of 2nd Manassas 20 August 1862. Hiram died of wounds in Chimborazo Hospital #2 and is buried in Richmond, VA, he was 23. CSA cemetery. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0047, 00002257

Daniel Peterson, a second cousin three times removed was born in 1841 in Telfair Co, GA, the son of Henry "Hal" Peterson and Martha "Patsy" Gaskins. On 15 January 1871 when Daniel was 30, he married (my first cousin three times removed) Nancy Elizabeth Lott, daughter of John Madison Lott & Mary Jane Wilcox, in Coffee Co, GA. She was born on 22 June 1854 in Coffee Co, GA and died in Coffee Co, GA on 1 June 1922. Daniel was a member of Company E. On the roll dated Petersburg, VA March 1865, it shows he was discharged, disabled by disease. Daniel died in Coffee Co, GA on 28 November 1897, he was 56. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0048, 00000821

Daniel A. Tucker, a first cousin, 3 times removed was born 28 October 1841 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Micajah Tucker and Elizabeth Henderson. In September 1866 when Daniel was 24, he married Rebecca Harper, daughter of Lewis L.C. Harper Sr. & Dicy Whitley, in Irwin Co, GA. Daniel served as a private enlisting in Company A on 27 August 1861. He was discharged with disability resulting from measles at Camp Bethesda near Savannah, GA on 4 May 1862. He later enlisted as private in Company D, 64th GA Infantry on 20 February 1863, in Albany, GA. Daniel A. died in Irwin Co, GA on 22 December 1929, he was 88. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0061, 00001732 and 000226, 0061, 00001733

Jasper Tucker, a first cousin four times removed was born in 1835 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Elisha Tucker and Zilpha Williams. Jasper married before 1860 Susan, maiden name unknown at this time. Jasper enlistsed in Company A 27 August 1861. He was appointed Corporal 26 April 1862. Jasper died of typhoid fever, at Camp Bethesda near Savannah, GA, 15 May 1862, he was 27. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0061, 00001793

John Henry Tucker, a first cousin four times removed was born 23 April 1836 the son of Elijah Tucker and Lucy Ann Echols. John married Margaret Elizabeth Smith who was born in 1836 and died in 1908. John was a member of Company A. He died in GA on 19 January 1863, he was 26 believed sent home ill. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0061, 00001814

Micajah Tucker, a Great-Great-Great Uncle was born on 13 September 1822 in Laurens Co, GA the son of Richard Murphy Tucker and Mary V. Paulk. On 7 January 1841 when Micajah was 18, he first married Elizabeth "Betsy" Henderson (my great-great-great-great Aunt), daughter of Daniel J. Henderson Sr. & Sarah "Sallie" McBryde, in Irwin, Co, GA. She was born in 1823 in Irwin Co, GA and died in Irwin Co, GA in July 1859. On 2 January 1860 when Micajah was 37, he second married Francis Ann "Fannie" Harper, daughter of John L. B. Harper & Charlotte Gaskins, in Irwin, Co, GA. She was born in 1835 and died in Irwin Co, GA. in 1912. Micajah enlisted in Company A 7th Battalion Georgia Infantry mustered at junction on Augusta/Savannah Railroad 27 August 1861. His son Daniel also joined this same unit on the same day. This regiment later became part of the 61st Georgia Infantry. He later transferred 11th Georgia Cavalry State Guard Godfrey’s Company F. He died on 4 November 1897 in Irwin County Georgia at the age of 75. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0061, 00001856

William Marshall Vickers, a first cousin four times removed was born on 7 August 1843 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Elis S. Vickers and Rebecca Paulk. On 22 March 1866 when William was 22, he married Frances Pearl Lott, my great-great-great aunt, daughter of Daniel Lott Sr. & Catherine "Caty" Bowen, in Coffee Co, GA. She was born on 16 February 1848 in Tattnall Co, GA. He served as a Sergeant in Company A. Pension records show he surrendered at Appomattox, VA 9 April 1865. William died in Coffee Co, GA on 11 June 1916, he was 72. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0062, 00001074

George Daniel Willcox, a second cousin four times removed was born on 3 March 1837 in Irwin Co, GA the son of George Willcox and Sarah Daniels. George married Elizabeth Wells, daughter of Henry L. Wells. George as appointed 2nd Lieutenant on 27 August 1861 of Company A. He was elected 1st Lieutenant on 31 May 1862 and on 17 September 1862, he was elected Captain. He was wounded and disabled at the battle of Fredericksburg, VA 13 December 1862. He was disabled so severely that he was forced to resign from service on 15 August 1863. National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0065, 00001084

George Isaac Young, a second cousin three times removed was born on 10 August 1839 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Isaac Young & Nancy Roberts. He was a 4th Corporal who enlisted 27 August 1861 in Company A. He was killed in action at Sharpsburg, Md. 17 September 1862 National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0067, 00001911

James S. Young, a second cousin, four times removed was born on 24 April 1840 in Irwin Co, GA the son of Jacob C. Young and Laney Marchant. About 1860 when James was 19, he married Elizabeth "Betsy" Sumner, daughter of Joseph Sumner III & Mehala Smith, who was born on 27 February 1840. He was a private in Company A enlisting on 27 August 1861. James died of typhoid fever at Beaulieu near Savannah, GA, 23 March 1862 National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000226, 0067, 00001966

MUSTERING INTO SERVICE

The 61st Georgia Volunteer Infantry (also called the 26th regiment at one time) was assembled at Charleston, South Carolina in May 1862. The 7th Georgia Battalion was the foundation drawn on for establishment of this new regiment.

OFFICERS OF THE 61ST REGIMENT
 
During the existence of the of the 61st Georgia Infantry regiment the commanding officers included:
Colonel: John H. Lamar; Lieutenant Colonels: Charles W. McArthur (a former captain) and James Y. McDuffie (a former captain); Majors: Peter Brenan (a former captain), Archibald P. McRae (a former captain killed in action), Henry Tillman (a former captain), and James D. Van Valkenburg. Captains included: G.D. Wilcox, D.R.A. Johnson, Daniel McDonald, S.H. Kennedy, Charles W. McArthur, Peter Brennan, W. Fannin, J.M. Dasher, James D. Van Valkenburg, E.F. Sharpe, T.M. McRae, J.A. Edmondson, T.T. Colley. The adjutants were G.W. Lamar and G.C. Conner. The assistant quartermaster was George Higgins.
 
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
 
The 61st Georgia Volunteer Infantry was organized with men from the following counties:
Company A - Irwin Cowboys (Irwin County, Captains Wilcox & McDuffie)
 
Company B - Tattnall Rangers (Tattnall County, Captains Johnson & A.P. McRae)
 
Company C - Brooks Rifles and Wiregrass Riflemen (Brooks and Thomas Counties, Captains McDonald & Edmonson)
 
Company D - DeKalb Guards (Bulloch County, Captains Kennedy & Tillman)
Company E - Montgomery Sharpshooters (Montgomery County, Captains
McArthur & T.M. McRae)
Company F is called the Stark/Starke Guards
 
Company G - Wilkes Guards (Wilkes County, Captains Fannin & Colley)
 
Company H - Tattnall Volunteers (Tattnall County, Captain Dasher)
 
Company I - Thompson Guards (Macon and Bibb County, Captain Van Valkenburg)
Company K - formed with volunteers from Companies A-I (Captain Sharpe)

BRIGADE INFORMATION

During this time the regiment was brigaded under Brigadier General Alexander Lawton who had proposed formation of an elite brigade of Georgia troops to repel the threat posed by McClellan's advance from Williamsburg on the Confederate capital at Richmond. Later the brigade would be commanded by Brigadier General Gordon and finally by Brigadier General Evans. The brigade served with the Army of Northern Virginia and is often found in research named as the Lawton-Gordon-Evans Georgia Brigade named for its three principal commanders.

The Lawton-Gordon-Evans Georgia Brigade was initially comprised of six regiments, which besides the 61st Georgia Volunteer Infantry included the 13th, 26th, 31st, 38th, and 60th Georgia Volunteer Infantries. This brigade was raised at the call of Georgia Governor Joe Brown for the defense of the Georgia coast following the bombardment of Fort Sumtner in 1861.

The regiment began service as part of the Lawton-Gordon-Evans Georgia Brigade by participating in the Seven Days Battles in and around Richmond, Virginia, June 1862, later went with General Early to the Shennadoah Valley and continued to fight in numerous engagements until surrender at Appomattox in April 1865.

SERVICE ENGAGEMENTS

The 61st Georgia Volunteer Infantry regimental service included:

Seven Days Battles June 1862

Gains Mills, 27 June 1862

Malvern Hill, 1 July 1862

Bristoe Station, 27 August 1862

Groveton/Brawner's Farm, 28 August 1862

Second Bull Run or Manassas, 29-30 August 1862

Sharpsburg/Antietam, 17 September 1862

Fredericksburg, 13 December 1862

Chancellorsville, 29 April-5 May 1863

Winchester, 13-14 June 1863

York & Wrightsville, 28-29 June 1863

Gettsyburg, 1-3 July 1863

Battle of the Wilderness, 5-6 May 1864

Spotsylvania Court House, 10-12 May 1864

Monocacy, 9 July 9 1864

Winchester/Opequon Creek, 19 September 1864

Fisher's Hill, 22 September 1864

Cedar Creek, 19 October 1864

Hatcher's Run, 5-7 February 1865

Hares Hill/Fort Steadman, 25 March 1865

Appomattox Court House, 9 April 1865

SEVEN DAYS BATTLES PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN

The regiment with a strength of 1000 officers and men was ordered North from Charleston, South Carolina to Petersburg, Virginia in June 1862 to help support the Army of Northern Virginia. As part of the six regiments of the brigade which mustered between 6,000-7000 men, the 61st Georgia moved by train to the Shenandoah Valley to re-enforce General Stonewall Jackson. This troop movement was part of a deception planned by General Lee to mask his planned offensive against a massive Union force of over 100,000 men, led by General George McClellan. McClellan's men were occupying the lower part of the peninsula between the York and James Rivers since March 1862, and were slowly advanced northwestward toward Richmond.

PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN--SEVEN DAYS' BATTLES No. 200. -- Organization of the Confederate forces during the engagements around Richmond, Va. JACKSON'S DIVISION Fourth Brigade Brigadier General A. R. LAWTON, 13th Georgia, 26th Georgia, 31st Georgia, 38th Georgia, 60th Georgia (or 4th Battalion), 61st GA (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/2 )

Lee wrote to Jackson on 11 June 1862 telling Jackson of the new Georgia troops, including the 61st Georgia regiment now assigned to his command:

"Brigadier-General Lawton with six regiments from Georgia is on the way to you, and Brigadier-General Whiting with eight veteran regiments leaves here today. The object is to enable you to crush the forces opposed to you. Leave your enfeebled troops to watch the country and guard the passes, covered by your cavalry and artillery, and with your main body, including Ewell's division and Lawton's and Whiting's commands, move rapidly to Ashland, by rail or otherwise, as you may find most advantageous, and sweep down between the Chickahominy and Pamunkey, cutting up the enemy's communications, etc., while this army attacks General McClellan in front."

The strategy described in Lee's letter was speeded along on 16 June 1862 when the order went out for Jackson to move his army without further delay and join Lee's peninsula offensive.

As General Jackson's troops marched closer to Richmond, McClellan ordered fortification of Porter's positions north of the Chickahominy and established a second supply base at Harrison's Landing on the James River, allowing him the flexibility to move north or south when the Confederates mounted an attack.

A heavy skirmish south of the Chickahominy on 25 June 1862 prompted Lee to force his attack on the following day. General Jackson's army, still on the march, was nowhere near the point of attack. Marching his troops relentlessly for days following Lee's summons, Jackson bivouacked at Hundley's Corner on the afternoon of 26 June 1862, within three miles of the hard fighting underway at Beaver Dam Creek.

The 61st Georgia arrived with General Jackson's column and received its baptism of fire at the battle of Gaines Mill, 27 June 1862. Spurred on by General Richard Ewell's "Hurrah for Georgia," they formed a line of battle and advanced through a heavy wooded area until they met the enemy. The 61st Georgia along with the other Georgia regiments of Lawton's brigade were the first Confederates engaged in this battle, meeting the Union army near Cold Harbor. The regiment advanced into Boatswain Swamp on the far left of the Confederate line at 5:00 PM "in perfect order through the woods and sticky-wet soil." Casualties this day were light.

Would you like to learn more about the 61st and other Georgia regiments and also help support the cause of Southern Heritage?   More information on the history of this regiment is available in:

"Warriors of the Wiregrass"

 a soft-bound, 8-1/2 x 11 publication, consisting 500 pages, covering the history of 14 Regiments Georgia Regiments:

1st Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 4th Cavalry (Clinch), 10th Battalion Infantry, 11th Cavalry-State Guards, 20th Battalion Cavalry, 20th Volunteer Infantry, 29th Volunteer Infantry, 49th Volunteer Infantry, 50th Volunteer Infantry, 54th Volunteer Infantry, 61st Volunteer Infantry, 63rd Volunteer Infantry. 64th Volunteer Infantry, and Coffee County Revengers Local Defense Unit.....plus information on researching Confederate ancestors, obtaining Veterans Administration grave markers for Confederate veterans, SCV Iron Crosses and more.

The author has donated all profits from the sale of this book directly to the Moultrie SCV Camp to support Confederate History and Heritage preservation programs and the continuing fight to save our Southern Heritage. The retail price is $50.00 plus $5.00 shipping. Not a bad price when compared to single abbreviated regimental histories sold by others "up North" at $8-$15 each or cost of $112-$210 if purchased separately and having much less detail!  Discounts for current SCV & UDC members (20% off) and for bulk orders, schools, libraries, and teachers. Please contact the camp for discount information.

If you are interested send a check or money order made payable to the Moultrie SCV Camp #674  to: P.O. Box 1213 Moultrie, GA 31776.  Please include your name, address, and phone number.

Inquiries about the book, discounts, ordering, or content can be sent via email to Mr. Jack Bridwell, Moultrie SCV Camp or calling  (229) 985-8409

Please pass along to others as every book sold goes to preserve our Southern Heritage.

2001 John Griffin