62nd Georgia Regiment of Volunteers
(Infantry Mounted/Partisan Rangers/Cavalry)
Confederate States of America (CSA)
A Regimental History
 
Information gathered by John Griffin
(updated 21 January 2006)

 
It seems that there are no other links on the internet to information about this regiment.  I am posting some brief information from Confederate Military History and a bibliography on this regiment.  I do this in honor and remembrance of the men who served with this regiment, lest they be forgotten.
Before it was the 62nd Regiment, this unit was formed as the 15th Georgia Cavalry Battalion-Partisan Rangers, organized with six companies on 18 June 1862. Major Joel R. Griffin was the commander, later promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.  This battalion was assigned to the Cavalry Command, Department of North Carolina (June-July 1862).
 
Next in the evolution of the regiment came the designation of 62nd Georgia Regiment organized to serve as the 62nd Georgia Cavalry Regiment-Partisan Rangers also known as the 62nd Mounted Infantry and as the 62nd Georgia Cavalry Regiment.  The later is the most frequently found references. Some references to this unit can be attributed to the 2nd Georgia Partisan Ranger Regiment.  With the various designations and changes in title, this regiment can be very difficult to follow through the war.  I will try to identify the various components and actions of this group of men.  A majority of men appear to be recruited from Georgia were from Dougherty, Liberty, and Baker Counties. In December 1863, it reported 408 effective men.
 
This regiment was organized with seven Georgia companies and three North Carolina companies via the increase of the 15th Cavalry Battalion Partisan Rangers to a full regiment on 1 August 1862.  Later this regiment would be broken up with the seven Georgia companies going to form the 8th Georgia Cavalry Regiment and the three North Carolina companies becoming part of the 16th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion.  These changes were authorized by Special Order #161 issued by the Adjutant and Inspector General's Office on 11 July 1864.  Based on looking at the official records it does not appear that the orders were completed until the end of October (about October 25) 1864.  The 8th Cavalry also merged with the 20th Battalion Georgia Cavalry for the last months of the war.
The 62nd listed organization with the following field officers: Colonel Joel R. Griffin, Lieutenant Colonel Randolph Towns, Major John T. Kennedy, Commissary T. Meara, Adjutant B. B. Bowers. The Company Captains were: (A) John P. Davis, (B) James W. Nichols, (C) William L. A. Ellis, (D) William H. Faucett, (E), W. A. Thompson, (F) S. B. Jones, (G) Pat Gray, (H) Thomas A. Jones, (I) John A. Richardson, (K) E. W. Westbrook, (L) Theodore T. Barham.
 
The following are some of the officers who succeeded those first named some showing increased rank between the original formation in 1862 and then surrender (as the 8th Regiment) in 1865.: Lieutenant Colonel John T. Kennedy, Major William L. A. Ellis, Commissary W. R. Baldwin, Adjutant W. A. Holson; Captains (B) B. B. Bower, (D) R. Duvall, (H) A. P. Newhart, (K) S. L. Turner.
The Regiment locations can be verified through official records at two camps.  One is Camp Hedrick near Wilmington in New Hanover Co, NC 23 July 1862 (Co E) and the other is Camp D.H. Hill near Garysburg in Northampton Co, NC 22 September to 2  November 1862.  (CSR 254/15) Companies of this unit were in and out of this camp at different times.
 
Assignments of the 62nd Georgia Mounted Infantry (Cavalry):

 

Cavalry Department of NC (April-July 1863)
District of North Carolina, Dept. of NC (July-Sept 1863)
Cavalry Department of NC (Sept 1863- May 1864)
Dearing's Cavalry Brigade, Dept of NC and Southern VA (May-October 1864)
1st Military District, Dept of NC and SVA (Co H) (Aug-Sept 1864)
2nd Military District, Dept of NC and SVA (Co G) (Aug-Oct 1864)
Dearing's Cavalry Brigade, Cavalry Corps, ANV (October 1864)
 
Battles

 

New Bern Campaign (January-February 1864)
Windsor (January 30 1864)
Petersburg Siege (June 1864- April 1865)
 
Bibliography- 62nd Georgia Infantry (Mounted Partisan Ranger Cavalry)

 

The Compiled Service Records of the members of this battalion may be found in microfilm roll series M266. These film are available from the Georgia Archives
Roll # CSR-67 Surnames A-D
Roll # CSR-68 Surnames E-J
Roll # CSR-69 Surnames K-R
Roll # CSR-70 Surnames S-Z
Confederate Military History, Extended Edition. Vol. 7: Georgia. Wilmington, NC: Broadfoot, 1987. See pp. 130-31 for a brief unit history.
Crute, Joseph H., Jr. Units of the Confederate States Army. Midlothian, VA: Derwent Books,1987. Ref. See pp. 115-16 for a concise summary of the regiment's service.
Georgia State Division of Confederate Pensions and Records. Roster of the Confederate Soldiers of Georgia, l86l-l865. Vol. 6. Hapeville, GA: Longino & Porter, 1959. pp. 276-368. Unit roster.

Jones, Charles E. Georgia in the War, 1861-1866. Atlanta, GA: Foot & Davies, 1909. See p. 45 for an incomplete list of unit officers.
Sifakis, Stewart. Compendium of the Confederate Armies:...Georgia. NY: Facts on File, 1995.pp. 164-65 
 

 
 
8th Georgia Regiment Georgia Cavalry
Confederate States of America (CSA)
 
This regiment of cavalry was authorized by Special Order #161 issued by the Adjutant and Inspector General's Office on 11 July 1864.  Based on looking at the official records it does not appear that the orders were completed until the end of October (about October 25) 1864.   Seven companies of the 62nd Georgia (called the Mounted Infantry or Partisan Rangers depending on source) were transferred to the 8th Cavalry while first three companies (A, B, C) of the old 20th Battalion Georgia Cavalry also joined this new regiment. The 62nd service had most recently been serving in North Carolina and Virginia, while the 20th Battalion had been serving in Georgia and Virginia. Go to 20th Battalion Georgia Cavalry Partisan Rangers for further information on this unit.
 
Some of the last dispatches show that the 8th Cavalry was in the area of Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia April 1965.  Learning of the planned surrender of General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, this regiment refused to take part in the surrender and fled the area to form up with the army commanded by General Joseph E. Johnston.  The regiment was forced to surrender two weeks later with General Johnston's troops at Durham Station in Orange Co, NC 26 April 1865.  A majority of Company A members were actually detailed to Worth County, Georgia trying to secure more mounts for the regiment.  When they learned of Johnston's surrender of forces, they traveled to Tallahassee, FL to surrender, thus ending the war service of these Georgia horse soldiers.
 
The Eighth Georgia Cavalry Regiment was organized with the following officers: Colonel J. R. Griffin, Lieutenant Colonel J. M. Millen, Major J. M. Millen, Adjutant T. J. Pond; Cars. (A) J.P. Davis, (B) B. B. Bower, (C) W. L. A. Ellis, (D) T. R. Duval, (E) W. H. Thompson, (F) S. B. Jones, (G) P. Gray, (It) T. A. James, (I) A. J. Love, (K) S. L. Turner, (L) T. G. Barham.  Some of the officers who succeeded those in command at the organization were: Majors. W. G. Thomas and S. B. Spencer, Adjutant M. E. Williams; Captains (A) T. S. Paine, H. L. Norfleet and R. Towns, (B) B. L. Screven, W. G. Thompson and J. N. Nichols, (C) J. C. Smith, (D) M. J. Smith, S. B. Spencer and W. H. Harrett, (E) J. G. Cress, J. M. Turpin and W. J. Deas, (F) M. E. Williams, (G) J. R. Harper, (I) J. B. Edgerton, J. A. Richardson, W. A. Lamand and J. T. Kennedy, (K) E. W. Westbrook.
 
The 8th Georgia was camped at Camp Hampton in Greenville Co, VA in August 1864 and later from 17-31 December 1864 and at Camp Johnson near Hawkinsville in Pulaski Co, GA 20 March 1865 (source CSR M266, Roll 539)
 
Assignments of the 8th Georgia Cavalry Regiment:

 

Dearing's Cavalry Brigade, Cavalry Corps, ANV (October-November 1864)
2nd Military District, Dept of NC and SVA (Co G) (October 1864)
Dearing's Cavalry Brigade, W.H.F. Lee's Division, Cavalry Corps, ANV (November 1864 to April 1865)
2nd Sub-district, 2nd Military District, Dept of NC and SVA (Co G) (January-February 1865)

 

Battles
Petersburg Siege (June 1864- April 1865)
Peebles' Farm (29 September-2 October 1864)
Jones' Farm (September 30 1864)
Harman Road (2 October 1864)
Appomattox Campaign (March-April 1865
 
Bibliography- 8th Georgia Cavalry

 

The Compiled Service Records of the members of this regiment may be found in microfilm roll series M266. These film are available from the Georgia Archives.
Roll # CSR-40 Surnames A-J
Roll # CSR-41 Surnames K-Z
Confederate Military History, Extended Edition. Vol. 7: Georgia. Wilmington, NC: Broadfoot, 1987. See p. 153  for a brief unit history.
Crute, Joseph H., Jr. Units of the Confederate States Army. Midlothian, VA: Derwent Books, 1987. Ref. See p. 88 for a concise summary of the regiment's service.
Jones, Charles E. Georgia in the War, 1861-1866. Atlanta, GA: Foot & Davies, 1909. See p. 42 for an incomplete list of unit officers.
Sifakis, Stewart. Compendium of the Confederate Armies:...Georgia. NY: Facts on File, 1995. p. 158
 
Memoirs of this regiment by Charles Paine Hansell and James Reid Jones are on microfilm reel #283-27 and 29 at the Georgia Department of Archives and History.  There is a 8 May 1864 letter of T. R. Reddick, in the Civil War Miscellaneous Collection.  These items would be of value to the researcher

 

62nd Georgia Regiment (Mounted Infantry/Partisan Rangers/Cavalry) in the OR’s

 

 
 
General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va: HEADQUARTERS CONFEDERATE STATES FORCES, Chattanooga, Tenn., August 28, 1862.
GENERAL: I have been placed by General Bragg in command of the base of operations of his army, my authority extending more than 100 miles and on both sides of the Tennessee River, headquarters at this place. He instructs me among other things to scour the country thoroughly in my front. My cavalry force is not as large as desirable for that purpose; I therefore telegraphed you this morning, suggesting that if the six companies of Partisan Rangers (Maj. [Joel R.] Griffin) at Augusta, four similar companies (Maj. [Charles T.] Goode) at Macon, several other companies at or near Savannah and for which I am told General Mercer says he has no use, were ordered to report to me here promptly they could be usefully employed in North Alabama, South and Middle Tennessee. I respectfully recommend that if there is no more important service for those companies they be ordered to report to me without delay. General Maxey, who is under my command, crossed the river yesterday (with a small force of infantry and cavalry), had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry and routed it. During yesterday and last night, by a judicious use of his artillery posted on this side of the river, he drove away the small body of the enemy from their entrenchments on the other side. They left in confusion, burned most of their subsistence stores, and a good deal of property fell into our hands. Respectfully, SAM. JONES, Major-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVI/2 [S# 23] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, MIDDLE AND EAST TENNESSEE, NORTH ALABAMA, AND SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA FROM JUNE 10 TO OCTOBER 31, 1862.CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#5)
 
 
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 203. ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, August 30, 1862.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
XI. The six companies of rangers at Augusta, Ga., under Maj. J. R. Griffin, the four companies of cavalry at Macon, Ga., under Maj. C. T. Goode, and the several companies of cavalry at Savannah, Ga., which can be spared by Brigadier-General Mercer, will proceed at once to Chattanooga, Tenn., and report to General B. Bragg, commanding, &c., for duty with Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones. By command of the Secretary of War:  ED. A. PALFREY, Assistant Adjutant-General. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LII/2 [S# 110] Confederate Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Southwestern Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, West Florida, And Northern Georgia.--#14)
 
 
General Winder, Commanding District, Richmond, Va. WELDON, N. C., September 21, 1862.
            GENERAL: I send under guard in charge of Sergeant Epting a prisoner named James Smith, who states that he is a stove molder by profession; supposed to be a deserter from the army--a spy or a bridge-burner, judging from appearances, conduct and contradictory statements. He appears to be well informed of the position of our armies, well acquainted with the locality of Richmond, and the fact of his having been loitering in this neighborhood for some time past creates the impression that he is a bridge-burner. He is of an age subject to conscription. Taking into consideration his conflicting statements, conduct, &c., I believe him not to be right. I therefore send him to you for further examination. I am, respectfully, general, your most obedient servant,  JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Post at Weldon, N. C. (O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME IV [S# 117] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 13, 1862, TO NOVEMBER 30, 1862.--#5)
 
 
Major-General Dix, Fort Monroe, SUFFOLK, December 2, 1862.
Our expedition, of which I advised you yesterday, has been a great success. Spies were sent in and a trap was sprung, but the rebels were caught. They attacked the advance this morning beyond Carrsville. We repulsed them, capturing the famous Petersburg Rocket Battery, and drove the whole force over the river. We are now shelling Franklin, having no means of crossing.
General Roger A. Pryor in command at Franklin; Col. Joel R. Griffin commanding the cavalry and Major Boggs the artillery; thirty odd prisoners now, more being found in the woods; many of the enemy killed and wounded. Our loss trifling. Colonel Spear led his cavalry most gallantly upon the enemy's advance. JOHN J. PECK, Major-General.
 
 
Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, Commanding Department of Virginia &c,  SUFFOLK, VA., December 3, 1862.
On the morning of the 1st, contrabands reported that the rebels were throwing up works near the railway, 4 miles this side of Franklin. I ordered Colonel Spear to proceed there during the night with portions of the Thirty-ninth Illinois, Colonel Osborn; Sixty-second Ohio, Colonel Pond; One hundred and thirtieth New York, Colonel Gibbs; Sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Follansbee; One hundred and third Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Maxwell; two sections of Davis', one of Howard's artillery, and a portion of his cavalry--in all 3,100--for information, and to drive off any force that he found there.
No works were found, but while breakfasting his pickets were driven in and a furious charge was made by some 500 cavalry, with a section of a rocket battery.
Colonel Spear took 300 of his cavalry and gallantly led them upon the head of the column, which recoiled under this impetuous attack. Confusion ensued; many jumped off and fled into the woods, while others put about for Franklin.
The cannoneers and horses being disabled, the gallant Pennsylvanians made quick work with the battery, and chased the Georgian squadrons to their floating bridge under the guns of Franklin. Besides driving the enemy over the river and capturing his section, 10 or 12 were killed and 20 made prisoners. Fourteen horses, harness, 7 saddles, 42 rifles, 70 rockets of 12 and 15 pound, and other minor articles fell into our hands.
No portion of the artillery or infantry was called upon, and I am happy to say that no loss of men or horses was sustained. Col. J. R. Griffin and Major Boggs commanded. General R. A. Pryor had just assumed command and was making his reconnaissance toward Suffolk.
This brilliant affair entitles Colonel Spear to great credit and adds to his already high reputation. He mentions favorably Major Stratton and Lieutenants Buttz and Roper.Very respectfully, JOHN J. PECK, Major-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26]
DECEMBER 2, 1862.---Skirmish on the Blackwater, near Franklin, Va. No. 2.--Reports of Maj. Gen. John J. Peck, U. S. Army.)
 
 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, General-in- Chief. HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS, Fort Monroe, Va., December 4, 1862.
GENERAL: I sent you a message the day before yesterday, by telegraph, in regard to an action near the Blackwater between a party of the enemy and a portion of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, sent out from Suffolk by Major-General Peck the previous day.
Colonel Spear, of that regiment, who commanded the expedition, returned last night, bringing back his entire force, consisting, in addition to a part of his own regiment, of portions of the Thirty-ninth Illinois, Colonel Osborn; Sixty second Ohio, Colonel Pond; One hundred and thirtieth New York, Colonel Gibbs; Sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Follansbee; One hundred and third Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Maxwell; two sections of Davis' Massachusetts Light Battery and one section of Howard's battery, Fourth U.S. Artillery; in all, about 3,100 men.
The expedition was sent out in pursuance of the object, heretofore explained to you, of keeping a part of my force in constant motion, and also to ascertain the truth of information reported to Major-General Peck in regard to the movement of the enemy in the vicinity of Franklin.
While Colonel Spear's force was breakfasting his pickets were driven in, and a charge was made by about 500 of the enemy's cavalry, with a section of a rocket battery. It was gallantly met by Colonel Spear, at the head of 300 of his regiment, and the enemy, thrown into confusion by his impetuous attack, recoiled, and was driven over his floating bridge at Franklin, which is protected by a battery of heavy guns. Ten or 12 of the enemy were killed and 20 were taken prisoners. We also captured 14 horses, a quantity of harness, 7 saddles, 42 rifles, 70 rockets of 12 and 15 pounds, and other minor articles. We sustained no loss either in men or horses.
General Peck speaks in high terms of the gallantry of Colonel Spear, who has distinguished himself on more than one occasion by h is prompt and spirited movements; and the colonel mentions with communication Major Stratton and Lieutenants Buttz and Roper, of his regiment.
The enemy retreated so suddenly that our artillery and infantry were not brought into action. The enemy's floating bridge swings from one bank of the Blackwater, which is very narrow, to the other, and is withdrawn from our side as soon as his forces cross.
Col. J. R. Griffin and Major Boggs commanded the insurgents. General R. A. Pryor has just taken command at Franklin.
With the means of crossing, the enemy's position at Franklin might easily have been attacked, and in all probability carried. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, JOHN A. DIX, Major-general. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] DECEMBER 2, 1862.---Skirmish on the Blackwater, near Franklin, Va. No. 1.--Reports of Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, U.S. Army, commanding the Department of Virginia.)
 
 
Maj. Gen. S. G. French, Commanding, GOLDSBOROUGH, N.C., [January] 21, 1863.
When Griffin's cavalry arrives use such couriers as may be necessary, but except in case of emergency I prefer that the regiment should be kept concentrated as much as possible and under the orders of General Robertson. A train has been sent to Tarborough for supplies. Get all you can from the country you are in.G. W. SMITH, Major-general. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA FROM AUGUST 20, 1862, TO JUNE 3, 1863.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#5)
 
 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hoffman, A. A. G. , HEADQUARTERS, Washington, N.C., February 16, 1863.
DEAR SIR: I have the honor to report that on Friday last, 13th, the cavalry company stationed at this post crossed the bridge, drove in the enemy's vedettes, surprised their picket headquarters (where some 40 cavalry were stationed), and captured 7 men and 12 horses; one of the men was dangerously wounded and is now in our hospital. The horses I turned over to the post quartermaster (a poor lot.); the saddles were retained by the cavalry company. The prisoners I will send to New Berne by the first opportunity, unless ordered to parole, and send them out the lines from this point. They belong to the Sixty-second Georgia State Troops, but are North Carolinians. If you wish me to parole them here please inform me. Have I the authority--if not, will you give it to me--to appoint a board of appraisers? The surgeons would like to purchase of the Government one or two of the captured horses. "All quiet along the lines." I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, LUKE LYMAN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Post. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] FEBRUARY 13, 1863.--Skirmish near Washington, N.C. No. l.--Report of Lieut. Col. Luke Lyman, Twenty-seventh Massachusetts Infantry.)
 
 
General D. H. HILL:  APRIL 13, 1863---5 p.m.
GENERAL: I have given the instructions to Captain Reilly about opening on the Yankee barracks, in accordance with your orders in dispatch of 7.30 a.m. today. Colonel Ferebee has been ordered to collect conscripts and also to watch the roads you speak of. He says that General Robertson, who was here yesterday, spoke of relieving Colonel Ferebee's men by Griffin's cavalry. I presume he means those on the Jamesville and Plymouth roads. I have frequently impressed upon Colonel F. to guard those roads well, and he informs me that the necessary steps have been taken to do so. My ordnance officer went for the ammunition to Boyd's Ferry this morning. I mentioned, in reply to your note this morning, that I thought it better for Colonel Martin's regiment to join me here, and will send him the order to-night. I can learn nothing of the condition of the enemy inside, but I fear that they can keep themselves supplied by fishing with seines, as fish are very plentiful in the river at this season. I sent up the Jamesville road this morning about 7 miles and found Griffin's pickets on it, so I presume it is all right in that direction. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. B. GARNETT,  Brigadier-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA FROM AUGUST 20, 1862, TO JUNE 3, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#10)
 
 
General R. E. LEE, Commanding, & c. RICHMOND, VA., April 21, 1863.
GENERAL: The President has shown me your letter of the 20th instant, on the subject of an increase of cavalry for your command. In answer, I send you the following list of cavalry regiments in North Carolina, viz, the Nineteenth and Forty-first North Carolina Cavalry, the Fifty-ninth and Sixty-third North Carolina Partisan Rangers, the Sixty-second Georgia Rangers, and the Seventh Confederate Cavalry, in all six regiments.
The President thinks that three of these regiments might be safely drawn from North Carolina, to increase your cavalry force, and as the limits of your command extend to include the troops in North Carolina, he suggests that you make your selection of these three regiments, and give the necessary orders in the case.
Besides this force, I think there can be sent to you Clanton's regiment from Alabama (I have telegraphed General Buckner on the subject), one regiment from Georgia, one from South Carolina, and three from Western Virginia, under Brigadier-General Jenkins. Measures will be immediately taken to secure this force for you, which, including the three regiments from North Carolina, which you will order yourself, will constitute ten regiments, the amount of cavalry force required by you. Very respectfully, &c., S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/2 [S# 40] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From January 26 To June 2, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#6)
 
 
Maj. Gen. D. H. HILL: HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., May 6, 1863.
GENERAL: Your letter of the 5th was received but a few moments ago. We have reports from scouts and persons from Maryland that Hunter's and Foster's armies are to come to Virginia.
The repulse of Hooker's force does not yet appear to be entirely decided. He has been driven back at all points, but holds still a position on this side the Rappahannock, near the United States Ford.
Your views regarding our policy I think sound, particularly as I urged the same course as yourself, and it must have been at the same time. Burnside's failure on account of mud was quite evidence enough to me that we had abundance of time to operate wherever we chose.
I shall endeavor to have forces sent you from South Carolina, and shall in all probability call for your forces as the enemy moves north. Watch his movements carefully and keep us advised.
The enemy's cavalry is still at Columbia, Va., and may try to effect his escape by uniting with Foster. Have all routes that he would most likely take blocked well (for as great a distance as time will admit of) with felled trees. This the citizens must do, as their only means of saving their horses and slaves. They can delay the enemy until we may have time to overtake him and destroy him. I am trying to get a mount for Hood's division to send in pursuit. I wish that you would impress every horse that you may be able to find not in necessary use on farms. This is no time to have horses for pleasure; all such must be put into service. If you do not need them send them here. I remain, general, yours, most respectfully,  JAMES LONGSTREET,
Lieutenant-General, Commanding. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA FROM AUGUST 20, 1862, TO JUNE 3, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#12)
 
 
Maj. Gen. D. H. HILL, Comdg.. Dept. of North Carolina, Goldsborough, N.C.: HEADQUARTERS, Tarborough, N.C., May 7, 1863.
GENERAL: Upon my arrival here last night I found that Colonel Evans had gone toward Greenville instead of Rocky Mount, as we supposed. I immediately recalled him. Claiborne's regiment has, strange to say, not yet arrived. As soon as possible I shall relieve the companies of the Sixty-third (Evans) below Kinston, and also the couriers between Goldsborough and Greenville and between Snow Hill and Kinston, as all the men belong to Ferebee's command. Please inform me by Captain Worthington (who will deliver this) how many men those lines will require under existing circumstances. There are a great many more at present than are needed on that duty since the withdrawal of the troops from Hookerton and Greenville. While on the railroad I should very much like to send the dismounted men of Claiborne's regiment to procure horses, and if this request meets your approbation instruct Captain Worthington to telegraph me at once before the men leave here. You can readily perceive, general, the necessity for the step proposed, which I hope you will approve. Colonel Claiborne is absent from his regiment, I understand. Was the authority granted from your headquarters? Very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. H. ROBERTSON,   Brigadier-General, Commanding.
Where had Claiborne's regiment better encamp? About Greenville forage is scarce and Griffin is there. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA FROM AUGUST 20, 1862, TO JUNE 3, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#13)
 
 
 
Goldsboro, N.C  May 8th, 1863
Cols Griffin & Claiborne: Lt. Gen. Longstreet directs that you impress all pleasure horses and forward them to him at Petersburg.  He wishes to mount a division of infantry.  Send out your details for the next four days with instructions to work diligently. Respectfully (signed) D. H. Hill Maj Genl
Capt. W.L.A. Ellis will immediately adopt measures to carry out the provision of this order in the vicinity of his station. By order of Col Joel R. Griffin, BB Bower, Adjt. (Private papers of William L.A. Ellis)
 
 
Maj. ARCHER ANDERSON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Goldsborough: CAVALRY CAMP, Near Williamston, May 13, 1863.
MAJOR: I have just returned from Jamesville, the lowest point occupied by our cavalry pickets on the Roanoke. I met Lieutenant-Colonel Towns, of the Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, on the road, who had been absent two days visiting his picket stations. He saw today a man from Plymouth day before yesterday. From him he learns that General Wessells is certainly in command there with two New York regiments, not exceeding 500 men each, and one battery; no cavalry. The cavalry and some other troops had left the town--supposed toward Suffolk.
The enemy is throwing up some entrenchments on a high point near Plymouth, either for the purpose of changing his camp, which is represented to be very filthy, or protecting some fisheries at the point. Colonel Towns considers this information entirely trustworthy.
I examined Fort Branch yesterday and feel satisfied, if properly garrisoned and provisioned, it can repel any attack of the enemy by land or water less than a regular siege. The supply of ammunition is good, and provisions for 1,000 men for thirty days are being placed in as rapidly as present circumstances permit. Coniho Creek, of which the general spoke to me, will be a very serious obstacle to a land attack on Fort Branch. The three roads crossing it near and below the fort are being effectually impeded. One of them has been closed entirely and the bridge destroyed. At one of the others entrenchments have been prepared and at the third are being prepared. This creek, however, is no impediment to an advance on Tarborough.
If the troops of my brigade are to be used exclusively to close Plymouth and Washington between the Tar and Roanoke, my impression is they should be moved nearer and occupy a line beginning from Jamesville or Gardner's Creek, near that town, and running toward Tranter's Creek, thence to the Tar River at or near Pactolus. On this subject I feel some hesitation in yet expressing a positive opinion.
If my brigade is to be held with a view to protect Weldon or some other point, it should not be removed beyond Hamilton or Greenville, except for picket guard.
Will you please inform me if any troops are to be stationed at Weldon and if they are to be under my command?
I shall go tomorrow to Greenville and thence to Tarborough, where I shall spend a day or two examining the quartermaster's and commissary departments.
The order substituting Colonel Griffin's cavalry regiment for Colonel Evans' has been received. I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,  J. G. MARTIN, Brigadier-General.
P. S.--Since writing the above the pickets have brought in 2 Yankee prisoners, who say that both General Wessells and General Hunt are in Plymouth with five regiments--the Eighty-fifth, Ninety-second, and Ninety-sixth New York, and One hundred and first and One hundred and third Pennsylvania; that the troops which left there recently went to New Berne, and they think General Wessells' brigade is going to Suffolk soon. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVIII [S# 26] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA FROM AUGUST 20, 1862, TO JUNE 3, 1863.CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#13)
 
 
Capt. W. L. A. Ellis 62d GA, Head Quarters, Martin's Brigade Greenville, May 26, 1863
Gen. Orders, No. 1
 I. Captain W. L. A. Ellis of the 62 Ga Regt. is hereby appointed Provost Marshall of the Brigade and Provost Guard detailed daily will report to him in the town of Greenville. By Comd of Brig. Gen. J.G. Martin Chas. G. Elliott AAA Genl. (Private papers of William L.A. Ellis)
 
 
Major-General HILL, Cmdg. Dept. of Va. and N. C., Petersburg, Va.: GREENVILLE, N. C.,
June 9, 1863.
GENERAL: I returned from Hamilton this morning and found your letter of June 8.
I will move to Kinston as soon as I am satisfied Foster is making a real advance. I think he will not advance unless the Yankee army meet with decided success at Vicksburg or elsewhere. Later in the day your letter of the 5th [received], informing me that Cooke had left Kinston, and wishing a courier line established to Rocky Mount.
I found that Colonel [Joel R.] Griffin had returned. He says he crossed the Chowan River last Saturday night near Colerain; that the enemy are not building a wharf at Dillard's farm, and that they have no artillery at Gatesville, and only about 200 cavalry. If you want Griffin's regiment, I think I can get along with three companies, or perhaps two of it. If you do not send him to Virginia, I think he had better go to Colerain or vicinity, in charge of all the troops across the Roanoke. I would like to know, if you can tell me, whether Colquitt would be likely to magnify the appearances of the enemy's advance or not. I am, general, very truly, yours,  J. G. MARTIN, Brigadier-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/3 [S# 45] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, And Department Of The East, From June 3 To August 3, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#1)
 
Organization Of troops in the Department of North Carolina, Commanded by Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill, C. S. Army, June 30, 1863. District of Cape Fear. Maj. Gen. W. H. C. WHITING. Jenkins' Brigade. Brig. Gen. M. JENKINS.
CAVALRY.
7th Confederate, Col. W. C. Claiborne.
62d Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
41st North Carolina (3d Cavalry), Col. John A. Baker.
(O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/3 [S# 45] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, And Department Of The East, From June 3 To August 3, 1863.CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#1)
 
 
Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON:  PETERSBURG, July 7, 1863.
Our troops in Suffolk. Enemy fallen back to and fortifying Bowers' Hill. Corcoran in command. Foster gone to Pennsylvania. Enemy left nothing. Suffolk not destroyed. Special instructions from Corcoran prohibiting it. Two gunboats in Nansemond. Colonel [J. R.] Griffin will reconnoiter again today.  E. B. MONTAGUE, Colonel, Commanding (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/3 [S# 45] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, And Department Of The East, From June 3 To August 3, 1863.CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#1)
 
 
Major-General ELZEY: FRANKLIN, August 1, 1863--10 a.m.
All quiet along the Blackwater line. Sent scouts in the direction of Suffolk this morning. Yankees carried off a great deal of plunder from Murfreesborough. A battalion of infantry should be at Murfreesborough, N. C., 400 or 500 in number, so as to defeat another raid. We should have more cavalry in this section. Spear controls, in two regiments, 1,500 men, cavalry. I would like to have a 6 or 12 pounder rifled gun, with ammunition complete. I can furnish horses and men for it. I am, very respectfully, JOEL R. GRIFFIN,  Colonel, Commanding.
------
General ARNOLD ELZEY:  FRANKLIN, August 2, 1863.
Enemy's infantry, 2,500 strong, under General Foster, took their boats for New Berne, N. C., Thursday night, at Winton, on the Chowan. Cavalry, under Spear, crossed soon after, and moved in the direction of Suffolk. Yesterday morning, at 9 o'clock, their cavalry passed within half a mile of South Quay, 6 miles from Franklin, Va. They had no stragglers in this expedition we could pick up. In our skirmishes with them we lost 6 men; 2 of theirs were killed, and others wounded. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding.
-----
Maj. Gen. ARNOLD ELZEY: HEADQUARTERS,  Petersburg, Va., August 3, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report that, as reported by officers on the lines, the enemy has retired from this front. Colonel Griffin reports the infantry retired to New Berne, the cavalry, &c., by way of Suffolk. I therefore think it safe, whenever you think it best, to bring back the previous arrangement of troops. Very truly and respectfully, your obedient servant, M. JENKINS, Brigadier-General.  (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/3 [S# 45]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, And Department Of The East, From June 3 To August 3, 1863.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#1)
 
 
Major-General FOSTER:  GETTY'S HEADQUARTERS, October 30, 1863.
I have received following telegram from Major Wetherill, commanding outpost, Suffolk:
Private John Wynton, alias Dunn, Irishman, Sixty-second Georgia Cavalry, permission to cross the river to bring turkeys, and came in with horse, saddle, &c. Crossed South Quay Ferry at sunset yesterday. Colonel Griffin's headquarters at Murfrees Station, 4 miles from South Quay, on the railroad. Griffin's light battery is at Weldon with five or six companies between Garysburg and Weldon. Griffin's picket on Chowan and Blackwater start at Colerain, below Winton, and extend to South Quay. Here the zouaves have a picket of 4 men and officer, at William Lawrence's.
Wynton states that there is to be a grand ball at Vaughn's house, half a mile this side of Murfrees Station, on the 5th of November; officers are circulating tickets about Gatesville.
The major of the guerrillas who captured the boats at South Mills spends most of his time between Gatesville and Reddick's. Rylander's battalion of infantry is at Franklin.
The stations picketed by Griffin's men from South Quay to Colerain are as follows: South Quay, 1 sergeant, 4 infantry: 1 corporal, mounted. Cherry Grove, no pickets. Manning's Ferry, 1 corporal, 6 privates, 2 on post; the reserve station 4 miles back. Bartonville, 6 privates, 2 on post; reserve half mile back; three-quarters of the time no picket there. Flay Island, at fork of Chowan and Meherrin, 6 privates, reserve 3 miles back. Winton, 6 privates and sergeant. California, 3 miles below Winton, 6 privates and 1 corporal. Colerain, 17 miles below California, 6 privates and 1 corporal.
It will be observed that Waineoake Ferry, between Cherry Grove and Manning's Ferry, is not picketed, and Cherry Grove only occasionally.
The horse belongs to J. Wynton: cost him $900. One pair Colt's army pistols cost $200, his private property. Shall the man be retained here until his horse rests, and then sent to headquarters with guard, and can any arrangement be made that he could receive anything for his horse and arms?
I would send scout out to Gatesville to pick up officers distributing ball tickets, but it might interfere with the ball. Possibly the commanding general might desire some United States cavalry to attend on the night of the 5th of November.
Wynton suggests if our troops are to attend the ball that the force start early in the night, traveling rapidly to South Quay, sending 2 soldiers in citizens' clothes in buggy in advance, who, on arriving at the ferry at Lawrence, would call for the flat. The pickets collect the ferriage, and are anxious to bring passengers over. The flat could thus be secured and picket captured. GEO. W. GETTY, Brigadier-General, Commanding. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#16)
 
 
General S. COOPER: PETERSBURG, November 3, 1863.
The following dispatch just received: Maj. E. Burroughs, of guerrillas reports enemy crossing the Sound to Elizabeth City in force--infantry, artillery, and cavalry; marching from thence to Float Bridge and crossing into Camden County, on supposed route to Norfolk. Float Bridge is on the Pasquotank River. All quiet in my front. Enemy's cavalry 4 miles below Suffolk, about 200 strong. Some armed negroes 1 mile below them.
The above is from Franklin, and signed "Joel R. Griffin, colonel, commanding." GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#8)
 
 
General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General: PETERSBURG, November 7, 1863.
The following dispatches just received: Col. J. W. Hinton just dispatches me, received at 3 p.m:
"I am pressed by enemy in considerable force, coming from Winton--artillery, infantry, and cavalry. Send me re-enforcements immediately to Murfreesborough."
I go, by General Ransom's order, with my two cavalry companies and one piece of artillery, leaving my infantry to guard Blackwater. Detachments of enemy's cavalry came within 8 miles of Franklin yesterday evening, but fell back at night. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel. Commanding Forces at Franklin.
Enemy 10,000 strong at Winton--artillery, infantry, and cavalry. My force is 1,200. The re-enforcements ought to be sent. M. W. RANSOM, Brigadier-General, Commanding, Weldon, N. C.
I do not know whether the enemy can be in such force as represented. I think not. General Whiting should be ordered to re-enforce, if necessary. If this movement is a feint toward Weldon, Petersburg is left entirely uncovered when Barton's brigade leaves here. GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General.
 
General S. COOPER WELDON, November 8, 1863.
Following dispatch just received from Murfreesborough: Are there any demonstrations being made elsewhere?
I arrived here this morning at 3 o'clock; enemy are landing troops and lumber from three transports at Winton; four gunboats went up river this morning. The gunboats at Reddick's Ferry yesterday have gone back. It is supposed the enemy are building pontoons at Winton; they have pontoon boats. Captain Duval, of my regiment, drove enemy's pickets into Winton yesterday; thinks they have small force, yet I do not think they will move across Potecasi Creek as before, but think they will take the plain road toward Weldon. The style of their preparations would indicate, I think, a raid or series of raids of some magnitude. I will keep you informed of movements. Enemy's landing at Winton may be for the purpose of establishing a permanent post for the purpose of cutting off from us large supplies of provisions, &c. The situation of Winton rather inclines me to this opinion. This would complete chain of posts on river and coast of North Carolina. Respectfully, JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel. Per W. A. HOPSON, Adjutant.;  GEO. E. PICKETT, Major-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#9)
 
 
General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond: Petersburg, Va., November 12, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the enemy had some seventeen steamers at Winton. They left without committing any depredation, and made no advance excepting a very short distance into the country, when they were immediately driven back by Colonel Griffin's cavalry, Captain Bower's company. General Ransom, whom I had sent down with two regiments, has returned to Weldon, the enemy having left before he arrived. About the same time, I had ordered Colonel Herbert from the Blackwater to the front, intending to make a diversion had the enemy intended anything in North Carolina. I enclose his report. He captured some 7 prisoners, 1 wagon, and 8 horses.
Barton's brigade is now at this point, having been sent back from Weldon upon the receipt of instructions from Richmond.
The prisoners captured report 6,000 infantry in Portsmouth; this I consider doubtful.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General, Commanding. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#9 HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,)
 
 
General S. COOPER, Adjt. and Insp. Gen., C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.: Petersburg, Va., December 15, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to enclose a dispatch just received from Colonel Griffin. It is impossible with my force to prevent these raids. The section of country that the enemy is now operating in is too far from our line to do more than watch their operations.
It is evident from the statement in Mr. Lincoln's message concerning the numbers of negro troops in the Federal service and their boasted efficiency, that their policy will be to increase that description of material as much as possible, as it strengthens their numbers and weakens our labor force. General Butler is evidently pursuing a steady course to effect this object wherever it is in his power, and in a short time all the country that he can overrun will be entirely denuded of slaves.
Would it not be advisable to cause all the slaves in the country so exposed to be brought back within our lines? We could send a cavalry expedition of our own down in such neighborhoods to collect and bring in the negroes. Whatever is determined on should be carried out at once, as every day loses so much valuable property to the Confederacy. In many cases, doubtless, objections may be made by the owners; but I think the case one of emergency. I enclose copy of Colonel Griffin's telegram.  Respectfully asking a reply, I am, general, your obedient servant, GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure]
 
Major-General PICKETT: FRANKLIN, December 15, 1863.
Enemy, 1,500 strong, negroes and whites, reported yesterday 12 miles of Gatesville, committing all kinds of excesses; insulting our ladies in the most tantalizing manner. People are fleeing their wrath. They are shipping all meat, grain, &c., in carts; taking clothing from men and women's backs, and destroying or carrying it off.
Yankee cavalry were in Suffolk on Friday and Saturday last in small detachments. Gunboats came up Nansemond River at night, and detachments came out and patrolled town; cavalry dismounted at Ivor and attacked them from northeast side of river with great success, with one or two rifled cannon. Force at Bernard's Mill small. A battalion of cavalry (Yankees) with one piece of artillery landed at Colerain, on Chowan, Saturday and Sunday, from gunboats. Some 50 marines were gathering up negroes and carrying them off. They had arrested several citizens there. Two companies of infantry should be located near this point, or placed at Winton, and cavalry sent there.
Beast Butler it is reported issued orders everything people had would be destroyed if they did not take the oath in his-lines. Some have already made a sacrifice. Something might be done to keep them out of Gates County, by use of cavalry and regiment of infantry. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding,
-----
General S. COOPER: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Petersburg, Va., December 15, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to enclose a second telegram received from Colonel Griffin. I have ordered him to send all the cavalry force he has down into Gates County. The report I look upon probably as a little exaggerated; but doubtless these fiends, backed, or rather instigated, by such a beast as Butler is, will be set on to commit any outrage. I enclose copy of my telegram to Colonel Griffin.
I will not stand upon terms with these fellows any longer. If our cavalry force was sufficient, we could, in a measure, prevent these inroads. The only other alternative is to evacuate the country. Butler's plan, evidently, is to let loose his swarm of blacks upon our ladies and defenseless families, plunder and devastate the country. Against such a warfare there is but one resource--to hang at once every one captured belonging to the expedition, and afterward any one caught who belongs to Butler's department.
Let us come to a definite understanding with these heathens at once. Butler cannot be allowed to rule here as he did in New Orleans. His course must be stopped. I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant, G. E. P. [PICKETT.]
 
[Enclosure No. 1.]
 
General COOPER: PETERSBURG, December 15, 1863,
 
Following dispatch received: Two thousand of enemy's infantry, mostly negroes, and 50 cavalry are at Elizabeth City conscripting negroes and plundering generally. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding at Franklin. I wrote concerning the above by courier. GEO. E. PICKETT,
 Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure No. 2.]
 
Col. J. R. GRIFFIN, Commanding, &c., Franklin Depot: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, December 15, 1863
Send all the cavalry force you have at once down to the scene of devastation. If they cannot drive off the enemy, they can at least hold them in check. Send orders to Colonel Hinton. Any one caught in the act (negroes or white men) of burning houses or maltreating women, must be hung on the spot, by my order. GEO. E. PICKETT, Major-General, Commanding. (.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#10, HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA)
 
 
General S. COOPER,  Adjt. and Insp. Gen., C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Petersburg, Va., December 15, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to enclose a dispatch just received from Colonel Griffin. It is impossible with my force to prevent these raids. The section of country that the enemy is now operating in is too far from our line to do more than watch their operations.
It is evident from the statement in Mr. Lincoln's message concerning the numbers of negro troops in the Federal service and their boasted efficiency, that their policy will be to increase that description of material as much as possible, as it strengthens their numbers and weakens our labor force. General Butler is evidently pursuing a steady course to effect this object wherever it is in his power, and in a short time all the country that he can overrun will be entirely denuded of slaves. Would it not be advisable to cause all the slaves in the country so exposed to be brought back within our lines? We could send a cavalry expedition of our own down in such neighborhoods to collect and bring in the negroes. Whatever is determined on should be carried out at once, as every day loses so much valuable property to the Confederacy. In many cases, doubtless, objections may be made by the owners; but I think the case one of emergency. I enclose copy of Colonel Griffin's telegram. Respectfully asking a reply, I am, general, your obedient servant, GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure]
 
0Major-General PICKETT: FRANKLIN, December 15, 1863.
Enemy, 1,500 strong, negroes and whites, reported yesterday 12 miles of Gatesville, committing all kinds of excesses; insulting our ladies in the most tantalizing manner. People are fleeing their wrath. They are shipping all meat, grain, &c., in carts; taking clothing from men and women's backs, and destroying or carrying it off.
Yankee cavalry were in Suffolk on Friday and Saturday last in small detachments. Gunboats came up Nansemond River at night, and detachments came out and patrolled town; cavalry dismounted at Ivor and attacked them from northeast side of river with great success, with one or two rifled cannon. Force at Bernard's Mill small. A battalion of cavalry (Yankees) with one piece of artillery landed at Colerain, on Chowan, Saturday and Sunday, from gunboats. Some 50 marines were gathering up negroes and carrying them off. They had arrested several citizens there. Two companies of infantry should be located near this point, or placed at Winton, and cavalry sent there.
Beast Butler it is reported issued orders everything people had would be destroyed if they did not take the oath in his-lines. Some have already made a sacrifice. Something might be done to keep them out of Gates County, by use of cavalry and regiment of infantry. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding,
-----
[General S. COOPER:] HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Petersburg, Va., December 15, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to enclose a second telegram received from Colonel Griffin. I have ordered him to send all the cavalry force he has down into Gates County. The report I look upon probably as a little exaggerated; but doubtless these fiends, backed, or rather instigated, by such a beast as Butler is, will be set on to commit any outrage. I enclose copy of my telegram to Colonel Griffin.
I will not stand upon terms with these fellows any longer. If our cavalry force was sufficient, we could, in a measure, prevent these inroads. The only other alternative is to evacuate the country. Butler's plan, evidently, is to let loose his swarm of blacks upon our ladies and defenseless families, plunder and devastate the country. Against such a warfare there is but one resource--to hang at once every one captured belonging to the expedition, and afterward any one caught who belongs to Butler's department.
Let us come to a definite understanding with these heathens at once. Butler cannot be allowed to rule here as he did in New Orleans. His course must be stopped. I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant, G. E. P. [PICKETT.]
 
[enclosure No. 1.]
 
General COOPER: PETERSBURG, December 15, 1863,
Following dispatch received:
Two thousand of enemy's infantry, mostly negroes, and 50 cavalry are at Elizabeth City conscripting negroes and plundering generally. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding at Franklin. I wrote concerning the above by courier. GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure No. 2.]
 
Col. J. R. GRIFFIN Commanding, &c., Franklin Depot:, HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, December 15, 1863
Send all the cavalry force you have at once down to the scene of devastation. If they cannot drive off the enemy, they can at least hold them in check. Send orders to Colonel Hinton. Any one caught in the act (negroes or white men) of burning houses or maltreating women, must be hung on the spot, by my order. GEO. E. PICKETT, (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#10)
 
 
Lieut. A. A. NEAL, Adjutant 132d New York Infantry. CAMP AT ROCKY RUN, December 18, 1863.
ADJUTANT: In compliance with orders from the colonel commanding outpost. I sent Captain Roche, Troop A, with such portions of Troops A, B, and E as were not on duty, and one howitzer under the command of Lieut. J. M. Fish, with also 2 army wagons, to report to Lieutenant Wells, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, now acting as aide-de-camp to Colonel Claassen, commanding outpost at the Pine-Tree, on the morning of the 16th instant, the object of the expedition being to bring in the families of some deserters from the rebel army who had enlisted in the Second North Carolina Volunteers.
Captain Roche, upon arriving at Nethercutt's Forks, sent Actg. Lieut. W. S. Turner, Troop B, with 23 men and 2 wagons, to Trenton, with directions, should he find the river fordable, to cross into that town with his whole party and bring thence the families of 2 men. Should he find the river too high to ford, he was to leave the wagons on this side, under a strong guard, cross the river with a portion of his men, and remove what he could bring away. Acting Lieutenant Turner, upon reaching the Trent River, found it utterly unfordable. He therefore had one of his men swim across and bring from the south side a small boat he saw there; with this he took across 10 men, and after great difficulty found a cart and ox team, with which he brought away the families and goods as directed, safely crossing them in his boat, making nearly a dozen crossings of the river in order to do so. Acting Lieutenant Turner reports seeing no enemy or signs of his presence, though he had to go nearly 3 miles west from the town.
After sending the party of 23 men to Trenton, he proceeded up the river with his detachment, having then with him 50 men and 1 howitzer and 1 wagon, with the view of removing the family of one Brighton, one of the above-mentioned Union soldiers. At the forks leading to the Chincapin Chapel, and near which road Brighton's family resided, the advance guard were fired upon by 2 cavalrymen, the vendettas of the enemy. The advance guard charged after these men, and succeeded in capturing 1 and severely wounding the other, though he escaped, owing to the fleetness of his horse, after a race of 3 or 4 miles. These vendettas kept up the Trent road to Kinston, to which place they had orders to hurry in case any of the Yankees should be seen.
Captain Roche, with the view of carrying out the objects of the expedition, proceeded down the left road leading to Chincapin Chapel, at which place there is a rebel camp, the prisoner states, consisting of 200 cavalry of the Sixty-second Georgia and 100 infantry, Foy's company. Some 300 yards from the main road a picket of 12 cavalry was discovered, who, having removed the planks from the bridge across Beaver Dam Creek, 300 yards farther on, were awaiting his approach.
A spherical case shot caused them to leave, when, upon reaching the bridge, Captain Roche relaid the planks, crossed, and was again fired upon by this picket, who had halted about 500 yards ahead in a piece of woods. Lieutenant Wells directed another spherical case to be thrown, with an effect similar to the first, our cavalry charging after the flying picket 2 miles, to quite near Chincapin Creek.
Across this creek, which is here deep, with steep and high banks, there was a bridge, the possession of which was essential to the success of the expedition. Upon reaching it, however, it was found that the enemy had destroyed it and were concealed in considerable force upon the opposite bank. A few shots were fired by the enemy, when the howitzer was run down within 20 yards of the opposite side and fire opened with canister, Captain Roche also dismounting his troopers and deploying them as skirmishers. His effective force had now dwindled much, the advance guard of 10 having kept up the main road with Lieutenant Marshall, and 10 more, under a sergeant, being left to guard the bridge across Beaver Dam Creek. The enemy fired rapidly, and apparently by volleys, from the front up the road at the piece. Three rounds of canister stopped that fire, when it was resumed from the left flank heavier than before. On this flank Troop A were actively employed, but canister caused the enemy again to shift his position to the front, where he once more essayed to drive away the cannoneers. Alternating the discharges of the piece between front and left flank, Captain Roche drove the enemy from the woods, silencing their fire, with what loss it is impossible to learn, as the enemy were under the cover of small trees and brush; yet, as the range was so short, it must have been considerable.
The bridge being completely destroyed, and having no means of rebuilding, Captain Roche immediately returned. The family after which he had gone lived a mile beyond this creek and a mile from the rebel camp previously referred to.
On the main road, 10 miles above where Captain Roche turned to his left, there is a camp of four companies of the Sixty-second Georgia Cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Kennedy, and he was anxious lest they might have gone down and endeavored to intercept his return. But seeing no one, he quietly retraced his steps to Nethercutt's Fork, whither Acting Lieutenant Turner had returned ten minutes before.
This skirmish lasted thirty minutes, eighteen rounds of canister being used. Our loss was 1 cannoneer killed (Private Clarence Kelley, of Troop B), and 1 slightly wounded (Private Stone, of Troop I). Two horses were also killed belonging to Troop A, which the captain was fortunate in replacing.
The detachment reached camp at 8 p.m. Captain Roche speaks in the highest terms of the manner in which Lieutenant Fish served his gun. This was the first time either of my pieces was in action. The cannoneers were all that could be desired. Private Joseph A. Lytle, Troop K, especially distinguished himself, as also Private John Ross, of D, and Corporal Duffy, of D, the gunner. I have promoted Lytle to a corporal therefor. Three horses captured; 2 are receipted for by Captain Roche and 1 by Lieutenant Fish. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, FLOYD CLARKSON,  Major Twelfth New York Cavalry, Commanding. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/1 [S# 48] DECEMBER 16, 1863.--Skirmish near Free Bridge, N.C.
No. 1. --Report of Maj. Floyd Clarkson, Twelfth New York Cavalry.)
 
 
General S. COOPER: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, December 20, 1863.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the enemy have been committing the most brutal outrages upon our loyal citizens in the vicinity of Elizabeth City. Immediately upon hearing of their appearance at that place, which is 50 miles from Franklin, our nearest post, I gave orders to collect all the cavalry from the Blackwater, relieving them with infantry, and sending also 130 mounted artillery from Dearing's battalion. The enemy being also reported as fortifying opposite Harrellsville, which is in Bertie County, and just below Winton, I ordered General Ransom with three regiments of infantry, via Franklin, to the scene of devastation, and to move down with infantry, cavalry, and artillery against them. You will see by telegram enclosed that the enemy decamped upon hearing of the approach of our forces. You will perceive that they have with their negro troops hung one of our soldiers and manacled ladies, and have taken them off in irons. They have run riot over all the country east of the Perquimans River, behind which they fell, burning the bridges upon the first approach of a squadron of our cavalry, My orders were to spare no one. But unfortunately our foe is too wary. They, like the Indians, only war on the defenseless. You will see likewise that they are going to play the same game in Suffolk that they did in Norfolk--make all take the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government or confiscate their property. I really do not know what advice to give in answer to the question they ask me. With my force it is impossible to protect such distant points. Still it makes my blood boil to think of these enormities being practiced, and we have no way of arresting them.
Eight thousand men are reported as at Washington. This I doubt. Probably they intend making a similar trip from Washington in the adjoining county to the Elizabeth City one.
I enclose also report of General Barton about the capture of some of our cavalry- A few days before, the enemy attacked our pickets near Free Bridge and were repulsed, leaving 5 killed on the field and 2 horses.
I will give orders to the cavalry now at or near Franklin to make an expedition to Suffolk and the vicinity. We of course cannot hold the place, but might possibly do the enemy some damage.
What answer had I better give the Suffolk people? I understand that the citizens of Norfolk have mostly taken the oath asked for by Butler. I communicated with General Butler in reference to Major Borroughs, but have as yet received no reply. I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Endorsement.]
 
It is impossible for the Department to answer the question propounded by General Pickett in respect to the deputation of ladies from Suffolk further than to state that taking the compulsory oath exacted of them by an infuriated [foe], for their safety, &c., should not, under the pressing necessities of the case represented by them, be considered as an indication of their want of fidelity to the Southern cause. General Pickett, in all other respects, appears to have taken the necessary measures, to the extent of his means, to check the outrages complained of.  S. C. [COOPER.]
 
[Enclosure No. 1.]
 
Capt. J. D. DARDEN, Assistant Adjutant-General: HEADQUARTERS OUTPOST,
Greenville, N. C., December 17, 1863.
CAPTAIN: It is my painful duty to announce the capture of about 35 men of Capt. J. W. Moore's company (H), of my command. A battalion of Yankee infantry crossed a foot ford which had been blockaded, avoiding my pickets, and making their way to and surrounding Captain Moore's encampment, about 6 miles below here, on this side of the river, and capturing, with the exception of 4 men and 2 horses, that portion of the command which was there.
As soon as I received information of their approach. I immediately moved after them, but, on arriving at Cheod Creek bridge, found that they had captured my pickets there from the same company, and had forded the stream at that point, leaving a wagon which they had captured with the command. One Yankee was killed there by the picket.
I am at a loss to account for the surprise, as I had only last evening, through my adjutant, cautioned Captain Moore to increased vigilance, from rumors that I had heard of a body of 35 armed deserters making their way through the county toward Washington. My scouts around Washington and citizens coming from below all report that no passing is now allowed by the Yankees, and that they are very busy making preparations for a raid from Plymouth and Washington, to concentrate at some point in the interior. A lady direct from Washington reports an increased force there; that they have 300 negro cavalry constantly drilling, and that they are very busy preparing for something, and, from what she could learn, were very nearly ready.
I have applied, captain, to General Ransom, Colonel McKethan, and through Colonel Waddell for some infantry at this point. I again most respectfully urge it. One of my companies picket 16 miles below here, on the other side of the river, one to 12 miles below on this side, and I have only one small company as a reserve here and as a support to the battery, and none to act independently. My men are very poorly equipped. I enclose my returns. Would have sent them sooner, but moved at daylight this morning, and have just returned. Hoping that I will be reinforced, and most respectfully urging it, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 ROGER MOORE,  Major, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure No. 2.]
 
Major-General PICKETT: WHITE MILLS, ON DISMAL SWAMP, [December] 19, [1863.]
Enemy have escaped me by river bridge, Pasquotank River. They were warned of my first advance to Gatesville. Their cavalry have gone to Norfolk, through Currituck County, N. C., the negroes, by Dismal Swamp Canal, to Portsmouth. They are on forced march. Last left South Mills this morning. My men are near the place. Nothing now to be done but collect all hogs and drive them out, which is a considerable item here; also bring out Colonel Hinton's guerrillas, which he requests. Enemy had at Elizabeth City 2,900 negroes and 500 cavalry. They hung Private Daniel Bright, of Company L, of my Sixty-second Georgia Regiment; hung him to a beam in a house; body remained suspended forty hours. Lieutenant Mundin's wife, with other ladies, were arrested, tied, and placed in jail at Elizabeth City, and carried in irons to Norfolk; even their feet tied. Negroes killed a child in Camden County, committing all other kinds of excesses. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure No. 3.]
 
Major-General PICKETT: WELDON, NC December 20, 1863.
No news from Hamilton; no danger there yet. Can we do anything for the people of Suffolk? I fear not. If possible, I will go there and fight Butler over, anyhow. I shall withdraw troops tomorrow from Franklin, unless you think we could catch them below Suffolk. I will move down, and, if the enemy are certainly gone, recall Griffin. Excuse me for troubling you so much. M. W. RANSOM, Brigadier-General.
 
[Enclosure No. 4.]
 
General GEORGE E. PICKETT:  WELDON, [December] 20, [1863.]
The following dispatch received from Franklin, dated 20th, to General Ransom:
A deputation of 2 ladies from Suffolk came last night. General Butler has notified the citizens of Suffolk that they must take the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government or leave immediately. They are loyal to the South, and wish your advice on the subject. Those left in Suffolk, if they should leave it, would lose their all, and not be able to support themselves in our Confederacy. Tuesday is the day fixed. He is to send a provost-marshal and troops there on that day to administer the oath. All quiet here. DE BORDENAVE, Major, Commanding Forces. Blackwater. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#11)
 
 
Maj. C. PICKETT, Assistant Adjutant-General, &c.:WELDON, N. C.,December 30, 1863.
MAJOR: I beg leave to represent to the major-general commanding this department the propriety of forming a new regiment of cavalry and artillery, to be composed of the following troops, viz:
1. The Twelfth North Carolina Battalion, now at Kinston, consisting of three companies (mounted). This organization was formerly known as Wheeler's.
2. Company L, Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, commanded by Captain Barham, numbering 136 men. This company makes the eleventh company belonging to the Sixty-second Georgia, and Captain Barham, under authority from the Secretary of War to raise a battalion, has increased his company to its present numbers. This company of 136 men would make two very respectable companies, sufficiently large for efficient action. This company may very well be detached from the Sixty-second Georgia.
3. There are in the Seventh Confederate Cavalry, Colonel Taliaferro, now at Ivor, twelve companies. The two extra companies might very well be taken from this regiment and made part of the new organization.
4. To these seven companies of cavalry I propose to attach one or two batteries of field artillery, and suggest the Macon Light Artillery, Captain Slaten, now stationed here, and one other battery to be selected from Lieut. Col. J. R. Branch's command.
These troops, organized into a regiment under an enterprising and vigorous soldier, would render valuable services to this department. At present at least one-half of this force is entirely inefficient for want of proper organization and management.
Our present lines of defense run at a distance of about 100 miles from the ocean, leaving a large area of country unoccupied by the enemy, but still unable for permanent occupation by our small force. This cavalry and artillery force, under a daring and skillful chief, would do much to secure to us this intermediate section. I need not say how important such an organization would be in meeting the raids of the enemy and harassing their outposts and transports. Over this command a good cavalry and artillery officer ought to be placed. As a valuable adjunct to this force might be added two companies of cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Wynn. These companies now belong to the State forces and could not be combined with regular Confederate troops, but might be made of great service if attached to this new command. At present two companies of cavalry not acting in concert with the main Confederate force can <ar49_896> be but of little effect. I understand the Governor of North Carolina has directed Colonel Hinton, commanding these forces, to report to Major-General Pickett.
I trust the major-general will pardon these suggestions, but I regard the matter as Important. I am, sir, very respectfully, M. W. RANSOM, Brigadier-General.
 
[Endorsement.]
 
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Petersburg, January 12, 1864.
I respectfully forward this communication, and recommend Maj. James Dearing as an officer well known to me. He has served with me for two years under my immediate command. I know of no one more justly entitled to promotion than Major Dearing. The service needs an efficient officer in the section of country to which he will go.GEO. E. PICKETT,  Major-general. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#11)
 
 
Abstract from return of the Department of North Carolina, Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett, C. S. Army, commanding, December 31, 1863; headquarters Petersburg, Va.
O-Officers.                   A-Effective total.
M-Men.                       B-Aggregate present.
P-Present for duty.       C-Aggregate present and absent.
                                    D-Pieces of artillery.
                                                                       
Command.                                                                   O         M         A         B          C         D                     Stations as reported December 20.
 
7th Confederate Cavalry (Col. V. H. Taliaferro).           24        409      409      528      666      3                      Ivor Station.
62d Georgia Cavalry (Col. J. R. Griffin).                 32        376      376      510      863      6                      On the Blackwater, &c.
3d North Carolina Cavalry (Col. John A. Baker).          34        554      554      684      971      ....                    Near Kinston.
Total cavalry     90        1,339   1,339   1,722   2,500   9
(O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIX/2 [S# 49] Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From August 4 To December 31, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#12)
 
 
Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON,  Secretary of War: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Petersburg, Va., January 12, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to state that, in accordance with our understanding in a conversation a few days since, I have ordered three companies of Wheeler's battalion from Kinston to Garysburg; at that point there are already two companies unattached Virginia troops. These five companies, together with two companies from the Seventh Confederate Cavalry (which has twelve companies) and a light battery (Graham's), not attached, will give eight companies for the new regiment which I propose. Colonel Hinton, commanding the Northeastern State forces, and Colonel Griffin, of the Sixty-second Georgia, in command at Franklin, both assured me that there were two companies of State troops under Lieutenant-Colonel Wynn (mounted) [who] would gladly be assigned and incorporated in this command. This force of mounted men will within a week's time be assembled at Franklin. I shall assign them to the command of Major Dearing, and ask that he may be ordered to take command of these troops, with the temporary rank of colonel. He is a young officer of daring and coolness combined, the very man for the service upon which he is going, a good disciplinarian, and at the same time generally beloved by his men. I am not saying too much in his absence in assuring von that Lieutenant-General Longstreet would strongly indorse his claims to promotion had he the opportunity.
One of the principal purposes in concentrating a command at the point above named under an efficient and trustworthy officer is that I have in contemplation an expedition to the counties of Gates, Pasquotank, and Perquimans, for the purpose of bringing out the bacon and provisions so very necessary for us at this present time. If the enemy do not make an offensive movement in North Carolina before I have had time to accomplish this I will advance a force toward Suffolk, so as to attract attention and collect a wagon train at Franklin to accompany the expedition. They can also, if successful, bring out conscripts. I hope this plan will meet with your approbation. I shall' conduct it with as much secrecy as possible. In the mean time, should the enemy make a movement on us either at Kinston or the railroad, I can order this cavalry to the point most needed. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. E. PICKETT, Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Endorsement.]
 
 ADJUTANT-GENERAL:  JANUARY 13, 1864.
Let the arrangement proposed by General Pickett be authorized, and Major Dearing be assigned, with temporary rank of colonel, to the command. It would be better, and General Pickett is advised, if it be practicable, to substitute two unassigned North Carolina companies, if to be found, instead of the two Virginia companies. J. A. S., (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIII [S# 60] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO APRIL 30, 1864.--#2)
 
 
 
 
Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,  General-in-Chief: HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Fort Monroe, January 17, 1864.
SIR: I received this morning the enclosed communications from Colonel Spear, commanding the exterior line, near Norfolk.
I reported some time since to the War Department the action of Brigadier-General Wild, to which this is in retaliation. Were this the act of General Pickett simply, I should readily know what course to pursue, but it is evidently the act of the Confederate Government, Private Jones, Company B, Fifth Ohio Volunteers, was evidently taken from among the prisoners of war at Richmond and turned over to General Pickett for this purpose; therefore it seems to me to be a subject for the action of the Government, not for the action of a commander of a department.
The strongest evidence that this is the action of the Confederate Government which I have is the fact that we have no Ohio troops in the department upon whom vengeance could have been wreaked in this way.
This action may be as well met now as at any time. Our Government has suffered its officers and soldiers to be outlawed for doing their duty. It has suffered its prisoners to be starved without retaliation, and now hanging is superadded. I state the fact. I do not presume to offer advice.
I have also the honor to enclose a letter from Colonel Hinton to me upon this subject.
I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.
 
[Enclosure No. 1.]
 
Maj. Gen. B. F. BUTLER, Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina:
HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES, Near Portsmouth, Va., January 16, 1864.
GENERAL: Pardon me for addressing you direct in an official communication, but the nature is such that I deemed it prudent to do so and to send the documents by an officer as special messenger.
As soon as the information relative to the hanging of the unfortunate man reached me I at first could not believe it, and directed Colonel Smith to send at once and ascertain the truth of the statement, the result of which is conclusive. (See document marked B.)
The body is now in my possession and I shall have it properly buried in my enclosure at 2 o'clock p.m. today, unless otherwise instructed by the commanding general.
Relative to the statement of the citizens of Pasquotank County (marked A), most of them are known to me, and those I know to be loyal I have marked (X)in red ink; the balance are what they term here neutral. The original placard (a copy of which is enclosed) is in my possession subject to your order.
Trusting that my action in the case may meet with approval, and respectfully requesting information relative to the burial of the body by return messenger, I have the honor to remain, with high respect, Your obedient servant, SAMUEL P. SPEAR,  Colonel, Commanding Division.
 
A. STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, Pasquotank County, January 13, 1864. General GETTY:
DEAR SIR: We, the subscribers, regret to say that there was found this morning a dead man (and still hanging) in our neighborhood. As the enclosed scrip was found pinned to his back, will show you by whom it was done. We have made a suitable box and buried him near the place he was found hung. Should his friends wish to get his body they can get it by applying to any of the subscribers.
We trust that you will not attach any blame to any of the citizens of this neighborhood, as we were entirely ignorant of any of the circumstances until we found the body. From all we can learn he was brought across the Chowan River to this place, and as soon as the men who had him in charge had hung him they went back.  JAMES FORBES, NEWTON C. JONES.  [AND NINE OTHERS.]
 
[ Enclosure.]
 
NOTICE. Here hangs Private Samuel Jones, of Company B, Fifth Ohio Regiment, by order of Major-General Pickett, in retaliation for Private Daniel Bright, of Company L, Sixty-second Georgia Regiment (Colonel Griffin's), hung December 18, 1863, by order of Brigadier-General Wild.
 
B. HEADQUARTERS, Deep Creek, Va., January 16, 1864. Col. S. P. SPEAR,  Commanding Division:
COLONEL: According to instructions, I sent out a company of cavalry under command of Captain Alman; they proceeded to South Mills and sent a detachment of twelve men and a lieutenant to the turnpike gate, where Samuel Jones, of Company B, Fifth Ohio Regiment, was executed. He was hung on Tuesday, the 12th.
One Mr. Williamson, living near by, on Wednesday made a coffin, cut him down, and buried him in the field opposite. Captain Alman was instructed to bring the remains in, which he has done, and I send them in ambulance to these headquarters for your disposal, also a pair of handcuffs which was taken from his wrists, which are rather ugly things. Nothing further of interest to report. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. B. SMITH, Colonel, Commanding Deep Creek.
 
[Enclosure No. 2.]
 
Maj. Gen. BENJAMIN F. BUTLER,  U. S. Army, Commanding at Fort Monroe: HEADQUARTERS NORTH CAROLINA STATE FORCES, Murfreesborough, N. C., January 15, 1864.
GENERAL: Enclosed I send you a copy of a letter addressed by Brigadier-General Wild, of the U.S. Army, to Captain Elliott, of the Sixty-sixth Regiment North Carolina State Troops. From the general tenor of the letter, and from the fact that it is addressed to an officer of my command, I am induced to believe that General Wild intended his threat against "guerrillas" to be applied to the officers and men of my command.
The Sixty-eighth Regiment of North Carolina State Troops, which I have the honor to command, was organized under authority obtained from the Governor of the State, and its officers are regularly commissioned by the Governor. With this explanation I desire to know whether it is your purpose to pursue the policy indicated in General Wild's letter to Captain Elliott, in the event you should hereafter capture any of the officers or men of my command, or are they to be recognized and treated as other prisoners of war?
I have captured a goodly number of the officers and men of the U.S. Army and Navy and have uniformly treated them as prisoners of war.
I desire to treat those I may capture hereafter similarly, but as a matter of course, I shall be guided in the future in my treatment to your men by the answer I receive to this letter. I desire further to call your attention to the fact that the ladies whose names are mentioned in General Wild's letter are, as I am informed, still held in close confinement in the city of Norfolk. I want to know whether it is your purpose to hold these ladies as "hostages" for a soldier legitimately captured? I shall be pleased to receive a speedy reply to this communication. Respectfully, your obedient servant, JAMES W. HINTON, Colonel, Commanding North Carolina State Forces.
 
[Sub-enclosure.]
 
JOHN T. ELLIOTT,  Captain of Guerrillas: ELIZABETH CITY, December 17, 1863.
SIR: I still hold in custody Mrs. Munden and Mrs. Weeks as hostages for the colored soldier taken by you. As he is treated so shall they be, even to hanging. By this time you know that I am in earnest. Guerrillas are to be treated as pirates. You will never have rest until you renounce your present course or join the regular Confederate Army.  EDWD. A. WILD, Brigadier-General of Volunteers. (O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VI [S# 119] UNION AND CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 11, 1863, TO MARCH 31, 1864.--#34)
 
 
Lieut. W. J. MUNDEN and Mr. PENDER WEEKS: HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Fort Monroe, January 26, 1864.
MESSRS: In answer to your application in regard to your wives held as hostages by General Wild for the treatment of his colored soldier, Samuel Jordan, of the Fifth U.S. Colored, upon a full examination I have determined—
First. That as no difference was made between Jordan and Daniel Bright on account of color, one being hanged in retaliation for the other by the rebel authorities, the case presupposed by General Wild when the hostages were taken in the persons of these women, that some different treatment would be meted out to his soldiers because of his color not having arisen, the order given by him for execution of the women in retaliation will be revoked.
Second. I will return the women to Northwest Landing with a copy of this note, as direction to the officer there that upon your placing yourselves in his hands in their stead, to be treated as prisoners of war unless some outrage not justified by civilized warfare is perpetrated by the men of your commands, the two women, Mrs. W. J. Munden and Mrs. Pender Weeks, will be delivered to their friends.
I take leave to assure you that nothing has been done to them to annoy, insult, or injure them, except the detention, as I have no doubt they will inform you when you see them.
I am compelled to require your presence and detention instead of your wives on account of further threatened retaliation made by the men of your regiment upon the soldiers who may be unfortunate enough to fall into their hands, and in order that the transaction may assure you and your people—
First. That we will carry on this war upon the rules of civilized warfare if permitted to do so by the rebel authorities.
Second. That we will not permit outrages upon our men without swift, severe, and stern retaliation. It is for your friends therefore to make the choice.
Daniel Bright, who was executed by General Wild, was a deserter from the Sixty-second Georgia; was wrongfully enlisted in the Sixty-sixth North Carolina; was engaged not in warfare, but in pillage and murder, as a guerrilla; was duly tried by court-martial, sentenced, and hanged; and the execution of Private Jordan in retaliation for that act will be made the subject of other and different measures from any that relate to yourselves and your treatment. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours, BENJ. F. BUTLER,  Major-General, Commanding.
-----
Col. JAMES W. HINTON, Commanding North Carolina State Forces: HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Fort Monroe, January 27, 1864.
COLONEL: Your letter per flag of truce of date January 15 was received, inclosing a copy of a letter of Brigadier-General Wild to John T. Elliott, captain of guerrillas. I am glad of an opportunity to state to you the exact policy which I propose to pursue in carrying on the war now raging between the Confederate authorities and my Government, because upon that subject there seems to be a wide misunderstanding. Perhaps the easiest way to elucidate it will be an explicit statement of what I do not mean to do.
First, then, I do not mean to conduct the war like a fishwoman in Billingsgate by calling hard names, such as "brute," "beast," &c.
Second. I do not mean to carry it on by any futile proclamations of outlawry against any officer or soldier duly authorized and commissioned for doing his duty.
Third. I do not mean to carry it on by threatening when I am beaten to take to the woods and organize guerrilla forces.
Fourth. I do not propose to carry it on unless my troops will obey my orders, and if they do not while I am in command of them I shall not afford them protection.
Again, I do mean to carry on this war according to the rules of civilized warfare as between alien enemies. To apply, then, this principle to the case you mention of the action of General Wild. General Wild found Daniel Bright, a deserter from the Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, carrying on robbery and pillage in the peaceable counties of Camden and Pasquotank. He was further informed and believed that being such a deserter he and his company had refused to obey any order emanating from you or the Governor of North Carolina, because you had frequently ordered the squad of which he had pretended to be one across the Chowan River, and they had refused to obey. These facts appeared to the court-martial before which Daniel Bright was tried, and, in my judgment, brought him within the strict meaning of the term "guerrilla."
If these facts are true, and they are known to you if they are so--the fact that he was a member of a Georgia regiment being shown by the placard put upon the body of Private Jordan, who was hanged in pretended retaliation for him--it is quite clear that he met his fate according to every rule of warfare, and the murder of Jordan in pretended retaliation for him will be met in such a way as becomes the Government which I represent.
If Elliott and his men had refused to obey your orders and to march as they were directed, but remained in a peaceable county against the will of the inhabitants, plundering and burning as they were doing, and as we were informed they were doing, they also deserved a like fate as Daniel Bright by every rule of civilized warfare. But if your men are met in the field, in the usual duty of soldiers, under your command or that of any other duly qualified officer carrying on war in any form that war has been carried on by any Christian nation, except the English against the Chinese, they will be treated whenever captured as prisoners of war, and all the more tenderly by me because they are North Carolina troops, most of whom I believe unwillingly in the service of the Confederate Government.
General Wild's threat was only against "guerrillas," and these are men coming within the description which I have given, and you can easily determine for yourself whether your regiment as organized does come within that description. If not, they may fear nothing worse than imprisonment. If they do, it will be more convenient for them not to get into our hands.
I leave it to your own good sense whether the kind of warfare carried on for the past year in the counties of Camden, Currituck, Pasquotank and the neighboring counties tends either to set up the Confederate Government among the nations of the earth or overthrow and cripple the Government of the United States; and if it does neither, whether such a warfare ought not be stopped by the most stringent measures. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,  B. F. BUTLER,  Major-General, Commanding. (O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VI [S# 119]
UNION AND CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 11, 1863, TO MARCH 31, 1864.--#36)
 
 
JACKSON NC , January 31, 1864. (Received at Richmond, February 1.)
Yesterday morning with force of 200 men and mountain rifled piece, after fight of two hours with 1,200 of enemy and three pieces artillery, [Yankees] were driven from Windsor, N. C., to their boats. We lost 6 men; enemy not known. J. R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIII [S# 60] JANUARY 30, 1864.--Skirmish at Windsor, N. C.
No. 2.--Report of Col. Joel R. Griffin, Sixty-second Georgia Cavalry.)
 
 
Maj. CHARLES PICKETT, Assistant Adjutant-General, HEADQUARTERS BRIGADE, February 21, 1864.
MAJOR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part borne by the forces under my command in the recent advance against New Berne. These were Kemper's (Colonel Terry), Ransom's, my own brigade (Colonel Aylett), twelve pieces of artillery, twelve companies of cavalry.
On the 29th ultimo I detached Colonel Baker, with seven companies of his regiment (Third North Carolina Cavalry) and five companies of the Sixty-second Georgia Cavalry (Lieutenant-Colonel Kennedy), to strengthen the picket-line between Neuse and Trent Rivers and to cover all the roads and paths south and east of Kinston, so as to prevent information reaching the enemy of any movement likely to create suspicion.
At daylight on the 30th, the troops commenced the movement, and bivouacked that night on the Trent after a march of 18 miles. The cavalry were advanced during the night and collected at Trenton.
On the 31st, Colonel Baker with his regiment was detached and ordered to move by a circuitous route, so as to reach the railroad at or near Croatan, 10 miles below New Berne, and having destroyed the track and telegraph line, to follow up the railroad and capture the enemy's picket at Evans' Mill, a station on Brice's Creek, 7 miles from New Berne. The artillery and infantry marched 21 miles and bivouacked 12 miles from New Berne. A dark and rainy night and a broken bridge prevented further progress till the moon rose--1.30 a.m. At this hour the column was again put in motion, but such were the difficulties of the road it was 8 a.m. before coming in sight of the enemy's lines. Several citizens of intelligence and known loyalty, who had been brought in during the night and in the morning, assured me that the fortifications on the south of the Trent were of the most formidable character, deemed by the enemy impregnable, and to be approached only by a bridge over Brice's Creek, a considerable stream, both deep and wide. A reconnaissance made by General Ransom, Colonel Aylett, and myself showed an open plain, varying from 1 mile to 2 miles in breadth, reaching to Brice's Creek; this very deep and about 80 yards wide, with marshy banks, the timber upon which had been cut down, a temporary bridge, on the east bank a block-house and breast-works, behind which a camp; at confluence of creek with Trent River, 1,000 yards distant, a field-work mounting ten guns; 300 yards east another work with eight guns; one-half or three-quarters of a mile east, near railroad bridge, and about 1 mile from Brice's Creek bridge, another very large work; south on Neuse River, about 2 miles from Brice's Creek bridge, a very large fort for land and river defense; a line of breastworks extending from this west to Brice's Creek, and terminating in a field work 1 mile above the bridge, other works of less importance covering the plain and connecting the forts; on north side of Trent, here 700 yards wide, two field-works commanding those on south side. The plan of operations required me to gain the south bank of Trent River, which was thought to be unprotected by fortifications, in order that my guns planted there should take in reverse the enemy's works between the rivers. Before starting upon the expedition I had made every exertion consistent with secrecy to arrive at accurate information as to this part of the enemy's position, having entertained doubts as to its not being fortified. Scouts and spies deemed reliable had been examined and reported that there were no works there. One in particular, as surveyor of the county and maker of the sketches and maps of the vicinity, upon which we relied, was sent to ascertain the facts. He returned three days before the movement and reported that his maps were correct; that there were no other fortifications than those abandoned by our troops at the capture of New Berne, and that these were constructed to meet an advance from the east and south. Brice's Creek also was represented by him not to exceed 90 feet in breadth. I was therefore unprepared to encounter obstacles so serious, and was forced to the conviction that they were insurmountable by any means at my disposal. Had it even been practicable to carry the fortifications on the south side of Trent, the possession of them would have been useless for the accomplishment of our object. In this opinion the brigade commanders fully coincided.
It still remained practicable to make a detour by Evans' Mill, to cross Brice's Creek, but this route would have brought me in front of the same and other fortifications. It had been determined in case of a failure in the attack on the south that my forces should be withdrawn to join General Pickett and assault on the west. I was already, by the nearest practicable route, 24 miles from General Pickett. This detour by Evans', while it added nothing to our chances of success, added also 11 miles to the distance between us. Immediately on arriving in front of the works of New Berne I advanced my line of skirmishers close to Brice's Creek. The enemy opened and kept up a fire upon them during the whole of the 1st and 2d instant from the works and field batteries. The resistance offered to General Pickett's advance seemed to be so obstinate, as indicated by the long continuance of firing in the same direction, that I deemed it advisable to make a diversion in his favor, and accordingly opened with six rifles upon the block-house and contiguous forts. Having accomplished this object the pieces were withdrawn.  The enemy seemed to have suffered much by this fire. He endeavored to throw a force across Brice's Creek, but it was driven back by the line of skirmishers.
Colonel Baker returned at midday, on the 1st, having failed to effect a passage across the swamp, assigning the incompetency of his guide and the difficulties of his route, enhanced by the rain and the darkness of the night, as his reasons therefore. He again made the attempt on the night of the 1st, with like results and for the same reasons. On the night of the 2d, with a small party dismounted, he succeeded after very great labor in reaching the railroad and telegraph line, which he broke up.
Lieutenant-Colonel Kennedy, on the morning of the 1st, ambuscaded a body of the enemy's cavalry, killed 1, wounded several, and took 5 prisoners. On the 2d he drove in the enemy's pickets near Evans', killing 1 and taking 1 prisoner.
Immediately after reconnoitering the enemy's position I dispatched several messengers, scouts, and couriers to General Pickett, informing him of the posture of affairs and asking instructions, and also endeavoring to open communication with him by means of signals. I received no communication from him until the evening of the 2d, when he directed me to join him for the purpose of making an assault on his front. I at once proceeded to do so. Having reached Pollocksville, 12 miles on my route, he directed me to fall back to Kinston, which was accordingly done.
My casualties amount to 1 killed and 4 wounded, whose names will be forwarded as soon as received.
I have been delayed in forwarding this report awaiting those of the brigade commanders, only one of which, herewith enclosed, has yet reached me.
The press and common rumor have been kept busy in casting censure upon my course. If my superiors entertain similar opinions, I request that a court of inquiry be called to investigate the matter. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. M. BARTON,  Brigadier-General.(O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIII [S# 60] JANUARY 28-FEBRUARY 10, 1864.--Expedition against New Berne, N. C. No. 14.--Reports of Brig. Gen. Seth M. Barton, C. S. Army, commanding brigade)
 
 
Report of the special committee to inquire into certain outrages of the enemy. The special committee, charged by a resolution of the House to ascertain and report the facts connected with the recent outrages alleged to have been perpetrated in the northeastern part of North Carolina by the armed forces of the United States, and to recommend such action as the dignity of the Confederate States should demand, submit the following report:
The committee have taken several depositions, and collected such further evidence as was accessible, for the purpose of obtaining a correct knowledge of the matters referred to them. This evidence is now presented to the House, with a brief outline of the facts proved.
In the month of December last, a large force of negro soldiers, in the service of the United States, and under command of Brig. Gen. Edward A. Wild, invaded the county of Pasquotank. While there they arrested a citizen of the county (Daniel Bright) at his own residence and hung him on the side of the public road, a few miles north of Elizabeth City. Upon his back, where he was suspended, was placed a placard with the following words:
This guerrilla hanged by order of Brigadier-General Wild. Daniel Bright, of Pasquotank County. Daniel Bright was a member of the Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, under command of Col. J. R. Griffin, and had received authority from the Governor of North Carolina to raise a company in that county for local defense Failing in the effort, he had retired to his farm, and was there seized, carried off, and executed.
Two most respectable married ladies were also made prisoners--Mrs. Phoebe Munden, wife of Lieut. W. J. Munden, and Mrs. Elizabeth Weeks, wife of Private Pender Weeks, of Capt. John T. Elliott's company. The first was arrested at her own house in the presence only of her three children, of whom the oldest was ten years of age, on Saturday, the 12th day of December, conveyed a few miles to Elizabeth City, confined in a room without fire, bed, or bedding, with several male prisoners, and tied by the feet and hands. A negro guard was placed in charge of the prisoners.
The succeeding day the other lady, Mrs. Weeks was placed in the same room. They were constantly guarded, and neither was allowed to leave the room for the most necessary duty but in company with a negro armed soldier. For a more minute recital of the indignities offered the sensibilities of the sex, the committee forbear to do more than refer to the testimony of a fellow-prisoner, and another, a resident of the town and all eye-witness of what he describes. Mrs. Munden was in delicate health, was forced from a home immediately laid in ashes, with all it contained, without other apparel than she wore upon her person, and passed several nights in the cheerless and cold apartment, to which she was confined at that inclement season, before the humanity of her captors was so far softened as to permit blankets to be furnished for her use.
They were kept until Thursday and then removed to Norfolk. It has been represented to her husband that when Mrs. Munden was carried off her wrists were bleeding from the stricture of the cords with which she was bound.
The purpose of these arrests of unarmed and helpless women will appear from the letter of General Wild to Captain Elliott, dated December 17, which accompanies this report. In it he says:
I still hold in custody Mrs. Munden and Mrs. Weeks as hostages for the colored soldier taken by you. As he is treated, so shall they be; even to hanging. By this time you know that I am in earnest. Guerrillas are to be treated as pirates. You will never have rest until you renounce your present course, or join the regular Confederate Army.
These ladies are still held in custody, as will be seen from the letter of General B. F. Butler,  in answer to a communication addressed to him by Lieutenant Munden and Mr. Weeks, dated January 26; and while he states that he has countermanded the order for their execution, threatened in the event of the hanging of his "colored" soldier by General Wild, he does not disavow in any other respect the acts of the latter.
Besides these acts of violence it is in proof that several private dwellings in Pasquotank and Camden Counties were set on fire and consumed, among which may be designated those of W. T. White, Capt. Willis Sanderlin, and Major Gregory--the latter, an aged citizen of more than sixty years, was seized and conveyed away. For what purpose General Wild's own letter to Captain Sanderlin, written after his retreat to Virginia, and bearing date December 22, will disclose. He says:
I shall hold Major Gregory as a hostage for the colored soldier captured near Shiloh. I shall treat him exactly as your people treat that soldier. If they hang him I shall hang Major Gregory. And you know by this time that 1 keep my word.
Major Gregory was released afterward and returned, not to his home, for that was destroyed, but to his friends, only to die from a paralysis with which he was stricken while a prisoner in the enemy's hands.
The committee invite attention to the minute account of the acts of this marauding expedition, contained in a letter written at Norfolk, December 28, to the New York Daily News, manifestly prepared by one familiar with its acts. They insert a brief extract only:
Negroes were permitted to curse and abuse defenseless ladies, to strip them of their jewelry and clothing, and offer them indignities which would offend delicacy to repeat. A small Confederate force captured two of his Negroes, in a skirmish, and for this he outraged all the laws of civilized war. He arrested two ladies of high character, permitted a brutal negro soldiery to tie them hand and foot (as I believe and am credibly informed), and kept them in this condition for two days and nights; brought them to Norfolk, and now keeps them confined in a close room. There he holds them as hostages for the return of his negroes.
The committee find that both the companies which the Federal officer designates as "guerrillas," commanded, the one by Captain Elliott, the other by Captain Sanderlin, were raised in those counties, under authority of the Governor of North Carolina, for local defense and to repel invasions; were duly organized, and their officers commissioned by him; and for a year or more had been in the regular service of that State. At the time referred to they had been attached to, and formed part of, the Sixty-sixth North Carolina Regiment, under command of Col. James W. Hinton.
The committee content themselves with reporting the evidence to the House with a short explanatory statement. The original letters and placard referred to are before them, and are submitted with this report. They forbear comment. It would add no force to the simple narrative of facts. W. N.H. SMITH, Chairman.
 
[Enclosures.]
 
VIRGINIA,  CITY OF RICHMOND:
This 10th day of February, 1864, personally appears William J. Munden, a citizen of Pasquotank County, N. C., who deposes and says as follows:
Affiant is first lieutenant in Company E, Sixty-sixth North Carolina Troops, under command of Col. James W. Hinton, and in the service of said State of North Carolina. Capt. J. T. Elliott commands Company E. This company has been in service about a year, more recently has been made part of Sixty-sixth Regiment. A portion of Company E made prisoner of a negro, a private in a regiment called "Fifth U.S. Colored," in service of the United States. This regiment was part of a force of the enemy invading the county of Pasquotank, and this capture was made on or about December 11, 1863.
Affiant's family was at his home in that county about five miles distant from the town of Elizabeth City. On the afternoon of same day affiant's wife, Phoebe Munden, was arrested at her home and brought to Elizabeth City. She was then confined in a room over a store with some fifteen or twenty others, of whom all but herself and another lady, Mrs. Elizabeth Weeks, wife of Pender Weeks, were men. Both ladies were tied by their hands and feet and detained three days, and were liberated only temporarily and to satisfy the calls of nature. When permitted to leave for this purpose they were accompanied by a negro guard, who stood over them with muskets, and they were compelled to do this in a public street. They were then carried off, their bonds untied, with the enemy's forces. The wrists of affiant's wife were bleeding from the stricture of the rope with which she was tied when she left. Mrs. Munden was taken from her three children, of which the oldest is about ten and the youngest four years of age, and no white person left with them. A young woman who lived in the family made her escape. A friend went there to take care of them at night. When carried off she was allowed to carry no change of clothes nor any night clothes. When confined in the room at Elizabeth City the ladies were compelled to sleep on the naked floor without bed or bedclothes or other covering, and without fire. About the third night Dr. W. G. Pool prevailed on the officer of the enemy to permit blankets to be carried in, and after some delay consent was obtained. Neither of these ladies have returned, but, so far as affiant knows or can hear, are kept still in confinement. While at Elizabeth City, when Mrs. Munden would complain of her treatment, she has been cursed and told she would be hung.
Mrs. Munden is about thirty-five years of age, and, as also affiant, are natives of Pasquotank County. Her health is not vigorous. Affiant and Mr. Weeks addressed a letter to General B. F. Butler in relation to the arrest and detention of their wives, and received answer, the papers herewith filed, marked A.
The facts stated are detailed by witnesses who know them of highest respectability, and are implicitly credited by affiant. During this invasion the enemy under Brigadier-General Wild hung Daniel Bright, burnt affiant's house and all it contained, stables, crop, and nearly everything on the premises. They also burnt the house of William T. White, a commissary to Company E, before it was attached to the regiment and afterward. They also burnt a barn of corn, wheat, and other things belonging to Ed. Jennings, a citizen not connected with any military organization.
They also, as affiant hears, burnt some six or seven houses in Camden County. Among others arrested was Major Gregory, about seventy years old, who, while gone, became paralyzed and died soon after his release and return home. All his property was also destroyed by fire. The above facts are all true so far as within affiant's knowledge, which he verily believes to be true. W. J. MUNDEN Sworn to and subscribed before me. W. N. H. SMITH, Chairman
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WILLIS SANDERLIN, Captain of Guerrillas: NORTHWEST LANDING, VA., Tuesday, December 22, 1863.
SIR: I hold Major Gregory as a hostage for the colored soldier captured near Shiloh. I shall treat him exactly as your people treat that soldier. If they hang him I shall hang Major Gregory. And you know by this time that I keep my word. Let the soldier be sent to Deep Creek village, at the end of Dismal Swamp Canal, and Major Gregory shall be at once restored.
 EDW. A. WILD, Brigadier-General of Volunteers. (O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VI [S# 119] UNION AND CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 11, 1863, TO MARCH 31, 1864.--#45)
 
 
General BRAXTON BRAGG, Richmond, Va.: PETERSBURG, April 15, 1864.
The following dispatches just received:
IVOR, April 15, 1864. Major PICKETT, Assistant Adjutant-General: The enemy still in considerable force this side of Suffolk. Two regiments infantry, one battery, and some cavalry camped in two miles of one of my posts. At this time the main force nearer to Franklin and South Quay. The reports of citizens below seem to point Weldon as the design of the expedition. The roads will probably retard the advance for several days JAS. D. RADCLIFFE, Colonel, Commanding.
IVOR, April 15, 1864. Major PICKETT: MAJOR: A dispatch from Milligan states the Twenty-third Massachusetts Regiment landed at Stone House Wharf at daylight yesterday. They were met by Casey, Woodley, and Cropp's detachments, about twenty-four men, who fought them from 6 a.m. till nearly dark. The Yankees fell back to Fort Boykin. One man captured from us and five prisoners taken from them. The force which landed at Chuckatuck have gone to the support of this party. This will make their strength about Smithfield three regiments and one battery. The force on roads to Suffolk still there. Four regiments were at Joyner's Bridge, on Griffin's line, late yesterday; retired shortly afterward. Will send Milligan's scouts reinforcements. If you think it prudent, they can at least annoy the enemy there without risk of capture. I shall annoy them near Blackwater all I can. I am fully prepared now to oppose a crossing should it be attempted. J. D. RADCLIFFE, Colonel, Commanding.
KINSTON, April 14, 1864. Maj. C. PICKETT: Hoke started before your letter reached me. Enemy attacked our pickets with cavalry and artillery this evening. Don't know extent of demonstration yet. M. D. CORSE, Brigadier-General.
FRANKLIN, April 14, 1864. General G. E. PICKETT: Four regiments enemy's cavalry, two whites and two blacks, camped at sundown within five miles of Franklin, near Joyner's Bridge. JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding.
-----
General G. E. PICKETT, Commanding Department of North Carolina, Petersburg, Va.: HEADQUARTERS FORCES BLACKWATER, Franklin, Va., April 19, 1864.
GENERAL: I forward copy of dispatch from Confederate agent to General Ransom. The information tallies with all indications that have recently come under my knowledge, and I consider it important. Respectfully, JOEL R. GRIFFIN,  Colonel, Commanding Forces.
 
[Enclosure.]
 
APRIL 16, 1864. General RANSOM:
DEAR SIR: I have been informed through a source perfectly reliable that [in] the contemplated attack on Richmond this spring the Yankees intend dividing their forces into three divisions. One division will advance upon the Rapidan, another upon the Peninsula, and the third by the way of Suffolk and Blackwater to Weldon. My informant has ascertained through a person perfectly familiar with their programme that the route by Kinston has been abandoned on account of its length and that they have determined to possess the Weldon bridge at all hazards. The attack upon it will be in very large force, so as to capture it if it is possible. If successful, the same army will proceed on to Petersburg and attack Richmond from that direction. My informant was shown maps of all the country around Weldon and Petersburg. The attack upon the Rapidan, my informant thought, would be only a feint. The strong effort would be made in the other two directions. He was also told that Burnside was accumulating a very large force at Annapolis to be in readiness at any moment, and that large quantities of stores and ammunition had already been deposited at Fortress Monroe for a rapid simultaneous movement of the army, whenever in readiness for operation. The Yankees have been delayed in their movements by the bad rainy weather and consequent muddy roads; but everything being favorable, the effort will be made in the next fifteen or twenty days. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/2 [S# 108] Confederate Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia.--#35)
 
 
General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General: WELDON, April 22, 1864.
Colonel Griffin, commanding at Franklin, reports as follows: My scouts report enemy have left Suffolk. Their main force re-embarked at Norfolk for Peninsula or New Berne. Will write tomorrow. J. R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding.(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/2 [S# 108] Confederate Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia.--#35)
 
 
Organization of troops in the Department of North Carolina, commanded by Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett, C. S. Army, for the month of February, 1864
Clingman's Brigade.
Brig. Gen. THOMAS L. CLINGMAN.
8th North Carolina, Col. James M.Whitson.
31st North Carolina, Col. John V. Jordan.
51st North Carolina, Col. Hector McKethan.
61st North Carolina, Col. James D. Radcliffe.
Cavalry.
7th Confederate Cavalry, Col. V. H. Taliaferro.
62d Georgia Cavalry, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
3d North Carolina Cavalry (41st Regiment), Col. John A. Baker.
6th North Carolina Cavalry (65th Regiment), Col. George N. Folk.
Dearing's Confederate Cavalry Regiment, Col. James Dearing.
(O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIII [S# 60] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO APRIL 30, 1864.--#7)
 
 
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 105. ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., May 5, 1864.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
VII. Capt. T. H. Bomar will proceed by railroad with his company, now on duty in Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, to headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, and report to General R. E. Lee, commanding, &c., for assignment to duty with his appropriate regiment, the Thirty-eighth Georgia Infantry.
VIIL The Ben Hill Artillery, Capt. John B. Higdon commanding, is permanently detached from the Thirty-eighth Regiment Georgia Volunteers, and upon the arrival of Captain Bomar's company, will proceed by railroad to headquarters Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and report to Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, commanding, for assignment to duty as an unattached.
IX. The Fifty-ninth North Carolina Regiment, Colonel Ferebee, the Sixty-Fifth North Carolina Regiment, Colonel Folk, the Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, Colonel Griffin, and the Seventh Confederate Cavalry, Colonel Taliaferro, will constitute a brigade, to the command of which Brig. Gen. James Dearing is hereby temporarily assigned. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/2 [S# 68] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM MAY 1, 1864, TO MAY 19, 1864.(*)--#1)
 
 
[W. H. C. WHITING.] HEADQUARTERS, Petersburg, May 19, 1864.
GENERAL: I respectfully forward the following report of the operations of troops under my command on 16th and 17th:
At 11 a.m. on 15th I received in cipher the following order, dated Drewry's Bluff, May 15, 1864, 12.15 a.m. :
GENERAL: I shall attack enemy in my front to-morrow at daylight by river road, to cut him off from his Bermuda base. You will take up your position to-night on Swift Creek, with Wise's, Martin's, Dearing's brigades and two regiments of Colquitt's, with about twenty pieces under Colonel Jones. At daybreak you will march to Port Walthall Junction, and when you hear an engagement in your front you will advance boldly and rapidly by shortest road in direction of heaviest firing to attack enemy in rear or flank. You will protect your advance and flanks with Dearing's cavalry, taking necessary precautions to distinguish friends from foes.This revokes all former orders for movements. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. BEAUREGARD, General, Commanding.
I at once caused Wise's brigade, then on city lines, to move to Swift Creek. As but one regiment of Colquitt's was present it was brigaded with General Martin. General Dearing's brigade of cavalry, which had gone in pursuit of the enemy under Kautz, was recalled. Not having infantry enough for twenty pieces, and the horses of some of the batteries not being in very good condition, I left the most for the protection of the city and Swift Creek, and ordered Colonel Jones with ten guns for the expedition. Having made all the arrangements in my power for the protection of the city and the various lines of railroad threatened on all sides by the enemy, I reached Swift Creek by daylight and at once commenced the movement. General Wise was ordered to lead, the artillery in his rear, and General Martin following. The enemy's outpost pickets were met within half a mile of the bridge on the turnpike road, and General Wise put out his skirmishers to clear the way. On reaching the first right-hand road General Martin was ordered with two regiments to move parallel to the column on the railroad, and  this route passing by Mrs. Dunn's house to the enemy's position within a short distance, General Dearing was instructed to cover our right with Griffin's cavalry and the left with Taliaferro's regiment, and then with his main body to effect a junction by the left with the general commanding. The column moved forward, skirmishing at the head all the way from Timberry Creek until the vicinity of the Junction was reached, where we were met by artillery and a stubborn resistance. Two pieces of artillery from Read's battalion were brought up and thrown to the right near Craig's house. The enemy commanding both the Junction and the turnpike, two were pushed along the turnpike and four placed by Colonel Jones well to the left to bear on the enemy's position. Martin's brigade was directed to take the railroad to the right, and Wise to do the same in front. In a short time the troops drove the enemy across Bake-House Creek, and line of battle was formed at Walthall Junction in order described.
When thus formed near 11 o'clock I had reached the point designated in my orders, whence I was to march as soon as I heard the sound of an engagement in my front. Nothing had been heard to indicate any such occurrence. No information of any sort reached me from Drewry's Bluff. Ignorant of the movements of the general and of the enemy, I was wholly unacquainted with the locality. Could I have been aware, or have divined what has been subsequently learned, the information contained in the general's dispatches of 9.15 and of 4.15, I could have spared my troops the harassing skirmishes which ensued, and resting until afternoon could have taken a good part in last movement, but unfortunately I knew nothing.
Having sent a dispatch to inform you of my position, I ordered Generals Wise and Martin to clear the way from Bake-House Creek, which they were holding in my front. Martin, on the right, and Wise, on the left, moved up in the direction of the supposed line of the enemy, they slowly retiring until we occupied the ground near what is Called the burnt house and the fields beyond. I had directed at the same time the cavalry under Colonel Taliaferro to go up the turnpike road and the right hand fork to see if he could find out anything. Here shortly an unfortunate occurrence took place, which much delayed me and increased my subsequent embarrassment. Being on the right of the line I was surprised to see the whole of General Wise's double line of skirmishes falling back at once, their right on the passes of Bake-House Creek and their left on the turnpike, the cavalry at the same time rapidly coming' back down the turnpike. The report was rapidly spread that the enemy in heavy force was moving down the turnpike on our left and rear. I learned since that some one, I know not who, ordered the lines back, for I am satisfied these troops would never move back of their own accord. Considerable confusion was created, much increased by a severe and drenching rain which fell at the time. Martin's brigade remained in position, but his skirmishers were recalled. It was some time before the line could be reformed, and in the mean time the enemy, who were evidently in observation, advanced to near Bake-House Creek. He was forced to withdraw by artillery, and the line was again made.
By this time the afternoon was far advanced, and I was still without any tidings from the main battle, of which nothing could be heard. Reports commenced coming in which greatly embarrassed  me. Colonel Griffin, on my right, reported indication of a diversion by the enemy on the opposite side. At Red Bluff information was received of the advance of a large force toward the city from the superintendent of the Petersburg and Weldon Railroad, and also a dispatch from General Colston forwarding similar information, while shortly after a message reached me from the cavalry on my left that the enemy were moving in that direction with infantry and artillery. While preparations and new dispositions of Wise's troops were being made for this, General Hill went over to the left to ascertain. It is possible this was a movement caused by General Dearing's successful attack in that direction, but of that, at the time, I was ignorant. It was evident that the enemy, resting in his works, was in observation on my right flank as I advanced, falling back to his lines as I moved on the turnpike, passing to the right and rear. A reconnaissance by General Pryor informed me that the line of what was evidently a moving force extended from the right-hand road at considerable distance from the Junction toward their fortifications. I felt myself in much perplexity called upon to decide whether I should, in spite of all reports, cut loose from Petersburg and move forward in absolute ignorance of even the fact that the general had made his proposed movements and the position of the main body of the enemy, or whether, the day being far spent, I should not take up a position from whence, when I learned the movement of the general, I could move early enough to aid the next day, or, if needed, be in place to defend Petersburg. At any rate, the Junction was no place to stay at. I ordered the troops of General Wise to move to the rear, to be followed by General Martin, intending at night to bivouac at Swift Creek, where the men had left their knapsacks and where their rations would be.
I then received the dispatch dated Fort Stevens, informing me for the first time of the movement of the early morning. General Dearing himself met me.  He had most gallantly performed his work, capturing 220 prisoners on his route, communicating with the general, and returning. He made me acquainted as far as he knew with the condition of affairs up to 1 o'clock, and I halted my troops. It was then too late for me to do anything, as long before I could reach either the right of our people or the retreat of the enemy darkness set in.
At 7.15 p.m. I received the general's dispatch of 4.15 p.m., to which I replied, "Too late for action on my part." The troops were then directed to their bivouac on the creek. My personal presence was absolutely required in Petersburg, and not having to clear the road, I hoped to be able to join the general readily on the 17th.
The conduct of the troops, officers and men, was most praiseworthy. Generals Wise and Martin, Colonel Jones, and Major Read were prompt and skillful in the disposition of their commands. Whatever was accomplished was due to the advice and ability of General Hill on the field, and very active, but not in command. General Dearing particularly distinguished himself by a brilliant attack upon the enemy at Chester.
At 3 a.m. on the 17th (still without rest) I received your dispatch directing a junction and a movement at daylight, and proceeded at once to the troops. They moved out, after some consultation with the generals, under the command of General D. H. Hill, I having relinquished it to him in consequence of the dissatisfaction expressed by Generals Wise and Martin with my movements and orders of the preceding day, deeming that harmony of action was to be preferred at that time to any personal consideration, and feeling at the time---as, indeed, I had felt for twenty-four hours--physically unfit for action. The junction was effected between 9 and 10, the enemy having retired to his fortifications in the night.
I give here the statement of the movements as they recur to me. I had no staff officers at all to keep the record of events or of time; no appliances required by a general in the field; no one to aid me in the direction of movements, except the volunteer services of Colonel Paul, for whose aid I am very grateful. My single aide-de-camp, Captain Strong, I was obliged to post in the rear to receive and forward the dispatches continually arriving from Petersburg. The above is simply a statement of the movements of the troops, with little or no explanation. It contains but a small part of the circumstances materially affecting my action. I think I could and would have effected more had I not considered myself bound by my orders to control my movements by my knowledge of an engagement in my front. In the absence of any information until too late of even that of firing, I did not feel justified in pushing with a small force in an unknown country between an enemy represented so strong and his fortifications unless I could feel certain he was actually engaged with our main body. Aware, however, that while much was expected of me, and in this case I have unfortunately accomplished but little, I desire to submit in addition to the report the following statement, not in excuse, but in explanation, if it should be thought that I had erred:
Called suddenly while in bad health from Wilmington by a telegraphic dispatch, simply desiring me to confer with the general, I came at once, attended by a single aide, and totally unprepared with anything for service out of my command. I was placed in charge not only of Petersburg, a threatened city, but the whole Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia. This was at 10 o clock on the 13th, the day of my arrival. That night and the 14th and 15th the railroad communications were cut on every side. The city was menaced from different points. It was uncertain whether the enemy, having secured his base, would make Drewry's Bluff or this city his objective point. Either was vital to Richmond. The number of troops was inadequate to the defense of widely extended lines, covering one of the most important and yet one of the weakest points in the country. The barrier on the north of the city was almost nothing. The confusion was indescribable. The late commanding general was very ill; the subordinate district commander but just arrived, like myself, on the 14th and 15th; the orders of pressing nature from Richmond and my commanding general were contradictory and embarrassing, as may be seen by comparison; at the time most needed communication was very hazardous and conducted in tedious cipher; add that I was entirely ignorant of localities as not to know my way through the streets. From what I could see and learn of the position, Petersburg was at the mercy of the enemy.
Under these circumstances, harassed with department business, without having taken off my clothes from the time of my arrival, or having been able to secure an hour's rest, I left my office before day on the morning of the 16th to conduct an expedition into a district entirely unknown to me or my troops, without a staff, without topographical engineers, without a reconnaissance, with no knowledge of the enemy's position, with a hurried and imperfect organization, not to defend a known and threatened point, but to attack an enemy of unknown strength in his own position, and upon contingencies which might or might not obtain. I do not think I should be held responsible for the escape of the enemy, for even with more information and under different orders I do not see how my force could have accomplished that. I can see now after the event how I might have done much more toward the defeat of the enemy. I add, only in explanation of action unlooked for on my part, and of which my career gives no warrant, that the painful condition of my system--previously ill and at the time disordered by absolute want of sleep for a long time, and personal labor due to want of officers--would, no doubt, have incapacitated me from acting with correct judgment and decision in a less difficult case. This condition was much aggravated by my exertions during the day, my personal attention to all parts of the field, the peculiar terms of my orders, the absence of information, and especially by constant and harassing reports from Petersburg and from my flanks. I say this not to excuse, but to account both for what I have done and not done.
I must also add that conscious of this disordered condition of my whole system, body and mind, I could not and do not blame Generals Wise and Martin for their expressions on the morning of the 17th, and I felt it my duty to relinquish the command to General Hill for the public good, knowing him to be thoroughly competent, as well as my superior. As statements of this kind in an official report should not be mere assertions, I beg you will, if you think necessary, have an inquiry made as to what I have said in explanation. I can only say that, viewed in any way, from your first telegraphic dispatch of the 11th instant until now, I have been and am most unfortunate. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/2 [S# 68] MAY 4-JUNE 2, 1864.--Operations on the south side of the James River, Va. No. 102.--Report of Maj. Gen. William H. C. Whiting, C. S. Army, commanding division, of operations May 16-17.)
 
 
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 12. HDQRS. DEPT. OF N. C. AND S. VA.,          May 25, 1864.
I. Col. William Butler is relieved from duty with Maj. Gen. B. R. Johnson, and will report at once to Brigadier-General Colston, at Petersburg, for the command of the sub-district between Swift Creek and Appomattox River. Colonel Butler's attention is called particularly to the defense of Lovell's Ford, across Swift Creek, and Fort Clifton, or the works in its immediate vicinity. Before reporting to General Colston,, Colonel Butler will obtain all the information practicable, relative to the defense of his sub-district, from Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill.
II. Colonel Ferebee, Fourth North Carolina Cavalry, after leaving two companies, or about 100 men, under a competent officer, with orders for them to report to General Johnson, commanding left wing, will proceed with the rest of his command to the right of our lines and report to Major-General Hoke, for the purpose of guarding the right flank and the country between Bake-House and Swift Creeks. On Colonel Ferebee reporting to General Hoke, the regiment of Colonel Griffin (Sixty-second Georgia Cavalry) will be relieved, and will report to Brigadier-General Dearing, commanding cavalry brigade, at or near Petersburg. Colonel Griffin will order one company to report to these headquarters. The two companies (or 100 men)of the Fourth North Carolina remaining on the left will report to General Johnson, to guard and protect the country from Johnson's left to Drewry's Bluff.
III. The general officer of the day upon being relieved will report daily to General D. H. Hill, in writing, the condition of the lines, the movements of the enemy, and everything else that deserves special and immediate attention. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/3 [S# 69]
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEAST VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM MAY 20, 1864, TO JUNE 12, 1864.--#2)
 
 
An approximation of the troops immediately in front of the enemy:
 
Hoke's division:                       
Clingman's brigade        1,800  
Hagood's brigade         1,800  
Colquitt's brigade          1,400  
Martin's brigade            2,000  
                                    -------  7,000
Johnson's division:                    
Johnson's brigade         500     
Ransom's brigade         1,800  
Walker's brigade          1,500  
Wise's brigade 2,200  
                                    --------            6,000
Infantry                         13,000
                       
Read                300     
Eshleman          350     
Owen               200     
Artillery            850     
                       
Three companies Sixty-second Georgia          150     
Company Sixty-second Georgia         40       
Baker               450     
                        640     
Shingler (about) 40      
Cavalry            680     
 
RECAPITULATION
Infantry             13,000
Artillery            850
Cavalry            680
Total    14,530
Respectfully forwarded to the Hon. J. A. Seddon, Secretary of War, for his information. G. T. BEAUREGARD,  General, Commanding.
[NOTE IN PENCIL.]--Enemy is supposed to have in our front about 25,000 men.G. T. B. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/3 [S# 69] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEAST VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM MAY 20, 1864, TO JUNE 12, 1864.--#1)
 
 
[General BRAGG:]  RICHMOND, June 4, 1864.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report the following as the result of my inspection of the important bridges and of the guards on the line of railroad between Richmond, Va., and Wilmington, N. C., in obedience to Special Orders, No. 123, paragraph XIII, Adjutant and Inspector General's Office:
Richmond to Petersburg.--At Falling Creek bridge, six miles from Richmond, there was no guard on the 27th ultimo.
Swift Creek.--The bridge over Swift Creek, about three miles from Petersburg, is about 280 feet in length. The guard on the 27th ultimo consisted of thirty-eight men well armed and two commissioned officers of Company E, Sixty-fourth Georgia Regiment, Lieut. J. F. Rice commanding guard. On the south side of the creek, commanding the approaches to the bridge, earth-works for artillery and infantry have been constructed. There was no artillery there. Being so near Petersburg, this bridge may be considered as within the line of city defenses; at least the requisite force could easily be sent from the troops in and about the city when necessary to repel any raid upon the bridge.
Petersburg to Weldon.--At the bridge over the Rowanty, a small stream eighteen miles south of Petersburg, there was on the 1st instant a guard of eighty men of the Holcombe Legion, well armed, Captain Dunbar commanding.
Stony Creek.--At this bridge, two miles farther south, the guard on the 1st instant was 250 men of Holcombe's Legion, well armed. There were also twenty-six mounted men of the Eighth North Carolina Cavalry employed as scouts, &c.
Nottoway River.--The guard at this bridge, five miles farther south, was, on the 1st instant, 120 men of the Holcombe Legion, well armed, Captain Briant commanding. The force at these three bridges was at that time under command of Colonel Crawley at Stony Creek. The bridges at Stony Creek and Nottoway were burned by the enemy in their late raid upon this road. They have been replaced by substantial bridges, over which the trains were running regularly. Earthworks have been thrown up and were being extended at the last-named bridges. There was no artillery there. I directed two guns to be sent to Stony Creek and two to Nottoway. These with the defenses and infantry force there will be sufficient to defend these bridges against any raid the enemy are likely to make.
Meherrin River.--Over the Meherrin River, about twenty miles north of Weldon, is a covered bridge about 310 feet in length. The guard on the 1st instant consisted of forty-two men of Louisiana Zouaves, armed with muskets, and twelve commissioned officers. Also a detachment of thirty men of Captain Bradford's (Mississippi) battery and a detachment of fifty men of battery connected with Colonel Griffin's Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, Lieutenant Dees commanding detachments, the whole under command of Colonel Coppens. There are extensive works on the south side. I directed earth-works for artillery to be thrown up also on the north side of river, more completely to protect the approaches to the bridge from that side. Five pieces of artillery there--two heavy bronze 12-pounders, two brass 12-pounders, and one small howitzer. The reserves of the counties of Southampton, Greenville, Surry, Sussex, and Brunswick were ordered to rendezvous at this point (Hicksford). There were seventy-five reserves there on the 1st instant; the whole will not probably amount to more than 300 men. They were being organized under direction of Colonel Garnett.
Weldon Bridge.--The importance of this bridge is well [known]; defenses very extensive. Troops stationed in and around Weldon on the 1st instant were:
Men.
Sixty-eighth North Carolina Regiment, Col. J. W. Hinton           548
Mallett's battalion, Major Habr                                                 349
First Battalion Reserves, Major Broadfoot                                269
Captain Shaw's artillery company                                                29
Captain Cherry's cavalry company, Fourth Regiment       63
Captain Chappell's infantry company                               32
Total    1,290
 
The bridge guard consisted of thirty men, well armed, from the Sixty-eighth North Carolina Regiment, two commissioned officers. Col. J. W. Hinton, commanding post.
Wilmington and Weldon Railroad.--Over Quaker Creek, near Halifax, eight miles south of Weldon, is a very high bridge, 150 feet long. No guard and no defenses there on the 31st ultimo.
Fishing Creek.--Over Fishing Creek, about twenty-two miles south of Weldon, is a fine covered bridge, 240 feet long. No guard and no defenses there on the 31 st ultimo.
Tar River.--The bridge over Tar River, about thirty-seven miles south of Weldon, was burned some time since. There is now a strong trestlework about 500 feet long, half over the water and the balance over low ground. No guard and no defenses there on the 31st ultimo.
Contentnea Creek.--The bridge over this stream, about sixty miles south of Weldon and five miles from Wilson, is 230 feet long--a covered bridge. No guard and no defenses there. There were watchmen at all these bridges on this road, employed by the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company, to prevent evil-disposed persons from setting fire to or otherwise injuring the bridges.
Neuse River.--The bridge over the Neuse River, eighty miles north of Wilmington and three south of Goldsborough, has been burned. It has been replaced by a trestle-work 600 feet long, 250 over the river and the balance over low ground. Works of defense have been constructed here, but not armed. The guard consisted of 160 senior reserves, armed with muskets and rifles, furnished by the State. Maj. B. F. Hooks, commanding.  Rockfish Creek (thirty-five miles from Wilmington).--This bridge is 450 feet long, decked over; a part of it extends over low ground, except in time of freshets. There was no guard and no defense there on the 31st ultimo. Raiders would have to reach this bridge by Duplin Cross. Roads from Onslow County, via Chinquapin.
Northeast.--The bridge over the Northeast Branch of the Cape Fear River, nine miles from Wilmington, is a very important one; a covered bridge 400 feet long, over water thirty feet deep. It would be difficult to reconstruct in case of its destruction. It is only eleven miles from the coast by a good road. The guard at the bridge on the 31st ultimo consisted of eight men of Captain Webb's artillery company, North Carolina Troops, with two brass field pieces. Works of defense have been constructed.
Smith's Creek.--The remaining bridge on this road is 240 feet in length, covered in. It is but a mile and a half from Wilmington, and may be regarded as within the line of city defenses. I have directed earth-works for artillery to be thrown up and armed for the defense of the different bridges named on the line of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. There were on the 30th ultimo at Goldsborough 500 reserves being organized into companies under direction of Captain Mallett and 290 reserves (First Battalion) at Weldon. The reserves of New Hanover and adjoining counties were to be organized on the 1st instant. If the reserves should not be sufficient, the guard for home defense, or a portion of them, might be called out in North Carolina, through the Governor. There are included in the State organizations a number of persons who do not belong to the reserve force or the regular service. In this way an infantry force might be obtained sufficiently large to guard effectually this line of railroad without withdrawing troops from other important points. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, ROBT. STRANGE. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/2 [S# 108] Confederate Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia.--#40)
 
 
Maj. R. S. DAVIS, A. A. G., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina. HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION, In the Field, near Point of Rocks, June 11, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the cavalry of my command, on the 9th instant, against Petersburg; also the reports of regimental and brigade commanders:
In obedience to instructions previously received, the command, consisting of portions of the Eleventh and Fifth Pennsylvania and First District of Columbia Cavalry, and a section of the Eighth New York Battery, about 1,300 men in all, commenced moving from camp between 11 and, 12 o'clock the night previous.
The infantry of General Gillmore's command, which should have preceded the cavalry, was delayed, and a portion of the cavalry also, in consequence, did not get across the Appomattox River until daylight. The cavalry then took the advance, marching south to the City Point road, where we captured 3 of the enemy's pickets, about 10 miles out from their entrenchments. The march was continued on roads nearly parallel to the enemy's works to the Jordan's Point, Prince George, and Norfolk and Petersburg roads.
Near the Prince George road we were delayed in driving Colonel Taliaferro's (Sixty-second Georgia Cavalry) [Seventh Confederate Cavalry] regiment out of their camp near their entrenchments, as skirmishers of his command were annoying the column. This regiment was reported by several prisoners that we captured to be between 300 and 400 strong.
The march was continued to the Jerusalem plank read, which we struck at a point about 4 miles from the entrenchments. The circuit proved greater than I expected, and we did not reach the enemy's lines until midday, marching continuously, as we were meeting the enemy's pickets on every road and they all retreated to a common center, except 4 or 5 that we captured. The enemy had the advantage of knowing our movements. On reaching the enemy's lines, it was evident that they were not strongly defended. The force seemed about 200 strong, with one piece of artillery. The First District of Columbia Cavalry were dismounted and deployed as skirmishers with a portion of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry on the right of the road. The Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry (mounted) moved forward in line on the works on the left to the entrenchments, where they dismounted and fired from the parapet. In about an hour we had carried the works and killed, wounded, or captured almost the entire force, with the piece of artillery and caisson.
As soon as a squadron or two could be mounted we moved on toward town. A deep ravine intervening just before reaching the city, and no enemy being visible, the advance was ordered to proceed into the city. On reaching the bottom of the ravine four pieces of artillery and several hundred muskets suddenly opened from the opposite crest, from such an elevation, however, that they overshot us. No one apparently was injured. Before the second volley opened the advance had fallen back under cover. The prospect of entering the city was here suddenly defeated, for while I thought it possible that the enemy was at that moment not very strong, it was strong enough to delay me an hour or two in the commanding position they held. By that time they could be re-enforced. I could hear nothing of General Gillmore's command; no firing could be heard in the direction of City Point, and I felt certain that his forces had retired. I therefore ordered the command to fall back, and as we retired the enemy opened from our right at long range with one piece of artillery and some musketry. Before leaving the entrenchments the enemy's camp of forty or fifty tents and some huts were burned, and also a large house with some stores and ammunition. We moved off and returned by the route we came and were not pursued or molested after getting on the road. We captured altogether 42 prisoners. Some of the officers who had better opportunity of knowing report the enemy's killed quite large. Quite a number of their wounded were left behind for want of transportation. The force that held the entrenchments were mostly residents of Petersburg and Prince George County, belonging to the second-class reserves. The loss of one gun and two carriages was not reported to me until we had retired, and I know nothing of the circumstances except what is contained in Lieutenant Morton's report. Had I known it in time I am satisfied that the gun at least would have been saved.
The conduct of the men on this expedition was even better than I expected, for while I have great confidence in them as cavalry, I did not know what they would do in assaulting entrenchments. The Eleventh Pennsylvania had the advance and as usual were constantly capturing the enemy's pickets, for which they seem to possess a great superiority. The First District of Columbia was the first within the entrenchments and pushed the enemy from the right to the left and some of them were the first to lay hand on the gun captured in front of the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry. The Fifth moved up in line on the works in fine order, dismounted, and took position on the parapet. The officers serving on my staff who were with me, Doctor Rivers, Major Wetherill, Captain Asch, and Lieutenant Allis were, as before, of the greatest service to the command.
The following is a summary of the killed, wounded, and missing: Very respectfully, your obedient servant, AUGUST V. KAUTZ, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Chief of Cavalry. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/2 [S# 68] JUNE 9, 1864.--Engagement at Petersburg, Va. No. 13.--Report of Brig. Gen. August V. Kautz, U. S. Army, commanding Cavalry Division.)
 
 
Organization of troops in the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, commanded by General G. T. Beauregard, C. S. Army, June 10, 1864. JOHNSON'S DIVISION. SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT.
DEARING'S CAVALRY BRIGADE.
7th C. S. Cavalry, Col. V. H. Taliaferro,
62d Georgia Cavalry, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
59th North Carolina [4th North Carolina Cavalry], Col. Dennis D, Ferebee.
65th North Carolina [6th North Carolina Cavalry], Col. George N. Folk,
Battalion Virginia Cavalry, Capt. Theodore G. Barham.
Battery (Virginia) light artillery, Capt. Edward Graham.
(O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/3 [S# 69] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEAST VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM MAY 20, 1864, TO JUNE 12, 1864.--#4)
 
 
Maj. Gen. W. H. C. WHITING: (Through General Beauregard.) RICHMOND, VA., June 18, 1864.
GENERAL: In response to your communication of the 2d instant relating to disloyal persons residing on the sound and requesting instructions, I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that the power of the military commander applies to remove these persons from their homes to a place in which they will not do mischief if there were actual operations going on in that portion of his department and it was necessary, but in the absence of such operations the better mode of proceeding would be to call in the civil authorities by making a specific charge against them that they were holding intercourse with the enemy or rendering to them aid and comfort and obtaining their judgment upon the matters charged. Any intercourse with persons of the description mentioned in the communication involves a responsibility upon the part of the officer doing it, and any action must rest not upon suspicion or surmise, but upon well-authenticated facts to be supported. If there be such facts the general would be justified in imposing such restraints as would prevent mischief. This, however, does not extend to sending them from the country. Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant, H. L. CLAY, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding, &c., Petersburg, Va.: HEADQUARTERS, Dunn's House, June 19, 1864--7.30 a.m.
GENERAL: A heavy column of infantry is passing on the opposite side of the river. Four regiments have passed and the fifth is passing now. I think, though don't know positively, that they crossed the pontoon bridge. Very respectfully, JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel, &c.
-----
Maj. C. PICKETT,  Assistant Adjutant-General: HDQRS. SIXTY-SECOND GEORGIA REGIMENT CAVALRY, June 19, 1864.
A column of eighteen regiments enemy's infantry and twelve to fifteen pieces artillery has passed toward Petersburg and are still passing. Enemy threw up a breast-work near white house about Port Walthall, in front of my lines last night. The above force crossed from this side on pontoon we think. Respectfully, JOEL R. GRIFFIN, Colonel Sixty-second Georgia Regiment Cavalry. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/2 [S# 108] Confederate Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia.--#41)
 
 
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 26. HDQRS. DEPT. OF N. C. AND SOUTHERN VA., June 19, 1864.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
III. Gracie's brigade will proceed to the north bank of the Appomattox River and resume its former duties in that vicinity, especially to guard and protect Fort Clifton and the batteries on that side of the  river, made to enfilade the enemy's forces and works on the opposite side. This brigade will move as soon as it is relieved from its present duties in the lines.
IV. The Sixty-fourth Georgia Regiment is assigned to and will form a part of Colquitt's brigade.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
VI. Johnson's brigade will immediately report to Major-General Pickett, commanding lines in front of Bermuda Hundred Neck, to guard his right flank toward Swift Creek.
VII. Brigadier-General Dearing will report at once with the three regiments of his brigade now with him (the Fourth North Carolina, Seventh Confederate, and Sixty-second Georgia) to General W. H. F. Lee on the Jerusalem plank road, to guard and protect the Weldon railroad.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
XI. The Sixty-fourth Georgia Volunteers, Colquitt's brigade, on the Swift Creek lines, will be relieved from duty by a portion of Gracie's brigade, and will proceed at once to the city of Petersburg and report to Brigadier-General Wise for service as a provost guard. By command of General Beauregard: JNO. M. OTEY, Assistant Adjutant-General. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XL/2 [S# 81]CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM JUNE 13, 1864, TO JULY 4, 1864.--#1)
 
 
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 161. ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, July 11, 1864.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
II. The seven Georgia companies belonging to the Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, with Companies A, B, and C, of Millen's Georgia battalion, hereby transferred, are organized into and will constitute the Eighth Regiment of Georgia Cavalry, to the command of which Col. J. R. Griffin is hereby assigned. The offices of lieutenant-colonel and major will be filled by promotion according to seniority.
III. The three Alabama companies known as Love's Alabama battalion, and Company D, of Millen's Georgia battalion, are hereby assigned to the Jeff Davis Legion, cavalry, which will hereafter consist of three squadrons, to wit: The five Alabama companies will constitute the first squadron, and will be commanded by a major; the three Mississippi companies will constitute the second squadron, and will be commanded by a major; the third squadron will consist of the two Georgia companies, under command of the senior captain.
IV. The eleventh company of Cobb's Legion of cavalry (Capt. F. E. Eve) is hereby transferred to and will form part of the Phillips Legion, Georgia cavalry.
V. The first ten companies of Cobb's Legion, cavalry, will constitute the Ninth Regiment Georgia Cavalry, to the command of which Col. G. J. Wright is hereby assigned.
VI. Companies A and B, of the Twelfth North Carolina Battalion, are hereby transferred to and will form a part of the Fourth North Carolina Cavalry (Fifty-ninth Regiment).
VII. The seven Georgia companies now belonging to the Seventh Confederate Regiment, with Companies E, F, and G, of Millen's Georgia battalion, which are hereby transferred thereto, will constitute the Tenth Regiment Georgia Cavalry, with the following field officers: Col. V. H. Taliaferro, Lieut. Col. T. D. Claiborne, Maj. J. H. Sikes.
VIII. The five North Carolina companies of the Seventh Confederate Regiment, the three North Carolina companies (Companies D, E, and I) of the Sixty-second Georgia Regiment, and Company C, of the Twelfth North Carolina Battalion, will constitute the Sixteenth Battalion North Carolina Cavalry, to the command of which Lieut. Col. John T. Kennedy is hereby assigned.
IX. The Ninth Regiment Georgia Cavalry, Col. G. J. Wright; the Jeff Davis Legion, cavalry, Lieut. Col. J. F. Waring; the Seventh Regiment Georgia Cavalry, Col. ----- -----, and the Tenth Regiment Georgia Cavalry, Col. V. H. Taliaferro, will constitute the cavalry brigade of Brig. Gen. P. M. B. Young.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
By command of the Secretary of War: SAML. W. MELTON,  Assistant Adjutant-General.
(O.R.--SERIES IV--VOLUME III [S# 129] CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OF THE CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO THE END.--#22)
 
 
FORCES IN THE RICHMOND AND PETERSBURG LINES.-General G. T. BEAUREGARD
HOKE'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. ROBERT F. HOKE.
Cavalry.
Brig. Gen. JAMES DEARING.
7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro.
8th Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
65th North Carolina, Col. George N. Folk.
(O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVI/2 [S# 68] MAY 4-JUNE 2, 1864.--Operations on the south side of the James River, Va. No. 88.--Reports of General G. T. Beauregard, C. S. Army, commanding Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, of operations May 16-June 2.)
 
 
Major-General HUMPHREYS,  Chief of Staff: HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, August 19, 1864.
GENERAL: The prisoners sent in this morning from the Fifth Corps are from Fry's and Davis' brigades, of Heth's division. They report that the whole of that division moved down the railroad yesterday and engaged the Fifth Corps. They all think that no other troops took their place in the trenches. There are prisoners from Colquitt's brigade, of Hoke's division, who say that that brigade is the only one of the division which moved down the railroad. There are also prisoners from Dearing's cavalry brigade. This brigade is composed of the Seventh Confederate Cavalry, the Fourth North Carolina, and the Sixty-second Georgia Regiments. They are in W. H. F. Lee's division. They have been doing picket duty from the right of their infantry line as far down as the Gurley house. Barringer's brigade were doing picket duty on their right, extending from the Gurley house down toward Lee's Mill. These two brigades, they think, are all the cavalry left in that vicinity. Prisoners all report that the enemy have no works between the lead-works and the position now occupied by the Fifth Corps. They heard of no troops coming from the north side of the James River up to the time they were captured. One deserter from the Sixth Virginia Infantry, Mahone's old brigade, reports that he went on picket night before last; that his brigade was then in the trenches, and that only two brigades of Mahone's division (Wright's and Perrin's) have left our front. He has not seen Harris' brigade lately, and thinks it possible that they may have gone away. Colquitt's brigade has been lying in reserve in the suburbs of Petersburg for some time past, and moved down the railroad about 10 o'clock yesterday morning. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. McENTEE,  Captain, &c.
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Colonel SHARPE, City Point, Va.: HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, August 19, 1864.
Heth's division and Colquitt's brigade are now in front of Fifth Corps on railroad below lead-works. Colquitt's is only brigade of Hoke's division which moved yesterday. Dearing's cavalry, composed of Seventh Confederate, Sixty-second Georgia, and Fourth North Carolina, together with Barringer's cavalry brigade, are also in front of Fifth Corps. Deserter from Sixth Virginia, who went on picket night of 17th, states that Mahone's brigade was then in our front, and that Wright's and Perrin's are the only brigades of Mahone's division away from here.  J. McENTEE, Captain, &c. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2 [S# 88] UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.(*)--#12)
 
 
Organization of troops in the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, commanded by General G. T. Beauregard, September 1, 1864.
JOHNSON'S DIVISION.-Brig. Gen. ARCHIBALD GRACIE, Jr.
CAVALRY.-Brig. Gen. JAMES DEARING.
7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro.
62d Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
6th North Carolina, Col. George N. Folk.
Graham's (Virginia) battery, }
Capt. Edward Graham. Horse Artillery,                }
(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2 [S# 88] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.--#3)
 
 
Major-General HUMPHREYS: HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS, September 28, 1864--11 a.m. (Received 11.12 a.m.)
I have just seen two deserters from Eighth Georgia Cavalry, who give important information about the enemy extending his entrenchments southwesterly from Petersburg. They were stationed at Poplar Spring Church. They are building works on Mr. Peebles' farm and how far south they do not know, and think there is a considerable infantry force in that direction, pretty thick, they say they are, and we would lose a good many men in getting them away. I send the men up at once. G. K. WARREN,  Major-General. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2 [S# 88] UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.(*)--#43)
 
 
Major-General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff: HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, October 15, 1864--10 a.m.
I have the honor to report all quiet along our lines during the past twenty-four hours. Four deserters came in during the day, two from the Fourth South Carolina Cavalry, Dunovant's brigade, two from Sixty-second Georgia, Dearing's brigade. JNO. G. PARKE, Major-general. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/3 [S# 89] UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--# 10)
 
 
Organization of Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.-Maj. Gen. WADE HAMPTON.
BUTLER'S DIVISION.-Brig. Gen. MATTHEW C. BUTLER.
DEARING'S BRIGADE.-Brig. Gen. JAMES DEARING.
7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
8th Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2 [S# 88] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.--#7
 
 
ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, October 25, 1864.
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XXII. Paragraph XXIII, Special Orders, No. 239, current series, assigning Lieut. Col. R. C. Smith to the command of the camp of the Maryland Line, near this city, is hereby revoked, and Lieutenant Colonel Smith will report to Brig. Gen W. M. Gardner, commanding, &c., Richmond, Va., for assignment to the command of the military prison at Danville, Va.
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XXIX. The second and third paragraphs of Special Orders, No. 161, current series, from this office, are amended so as to transfer Company B, Twentieth Battalion Georgia Cavalry, to the Jeff. Davis Legion, in the place of Company D, Twentieth Battalion Georgia Cavalry, which is hereby transferred to the Eighth Georgia Cavalry (Colonel Griffin).
XXX. The ninth and eleventh paragraphs of Special Orders, No. 161, current series, from this office, are amended so as to transfer the  Seventh Georgia Cavalry to Gary's brigade, and the Phillips Legion, Georgia cavalry, to Young's brigade. The commands will report accordingly promptly.
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By command of the Secretary of War: JOHN W. RIELY, Assistant Adjutant-General. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/3 [S# 89] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--# 2)
 
 
Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General R. E. Lee, October 31, 1864.
FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT.-Brig. Gen. HENRY A. WISE.
Post Lynchburg and Detailed Men.-Brig. Gen. RALEIGH E. COLSTON.
Garnett's Brigade.-Lieut. Col. JOHN J. GARNETT.
 
Battalion C. S. Zouaves, Maj. Fulgence De Bordenave.
Battalion Virginia Reserves, Maj. D. E. Godwin.
Section of Bradford's (Mississippi) battery, Lieut. Andrew J. Cochran.
Company H, Eighth Georgia Cavalry, Lieut. A. M. G. Wiggins.
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LEE'S DIVISION.-Maj. Gen. WILLIAM H. F. LEE.
 
UNASSIGNED.
Dearing's Brigade.
 
7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro.
8th Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
Graham's (Virginia) battery, Capt. Edward Graham.
(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/3 [S# 89] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--# 3)
 
 
Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, November 30, 1864.
 
JOHNSON'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. BUSHROD R. JOHNSON.
 
FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT Brig. Gen. HENRY A. WISE.
Post Lynchburg and Detailed Men. Brig. Gen. RALEIGH E. COLSTON.
Garnett's Brigade. Lieut. Col. JOHN J. GARNETT.
 
Battalion C. S. Zouaves, Maj. Fulgence De Bordenave.
Battalion Virginia Reserves, Maj. D. E. Godwin.
Company H, 8th Georgia Cavalry, Lieut. A. M. G. Wiggins.
Section of Bradford's (Mississippi) battery, Lieut. A. J. Cochran.
 
CAVALRY CORPS.-Maj. Gen. WADE HAMPTON.
HAMPTON'S (OLD) DIVISION.-Brig. Gen. MATTHEW C. BUTLER.
Dearing's Brigade.-Brig. Gen. JAMES DEARING.
 
8th Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
16th North Carolina Battalion, Capt. William K. Lane.
(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/3 [S# 89] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--# 5)
 
 
Organization of troops in the Department of North Carolina, General Braxton Bragg, C. S.Army, commanding, January 31, 1865.
 
SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT.-Brig. Gen. LAWRENCE S. BAKER.
Second Sub-District, Kinston.-Lieut. Col. Rufus W. WHARTON.
 
67th North Carolina, Maj. Edward Whitford.
Provost Guard, Capt. Allen Croom.
8th Georgia Cavalry, Company G, Capt. Patrick Gray,
6th North Carolina Cavalry, Maj. John J. Spann.
13th Battalion Light Artillery, Lieut. Col. Joseph B. Starr.
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Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General R. E. Lee, January 31, 1865.
CAVALRY CORPS.
LEE'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM H. F. LEE.
Dearing's Brigade.-Brig. Gen. JAMES DEARING.
 
8th Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
16th North Carolina Battalion, Capt. William K. Lane.
(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/2 [S# 96] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA (JANUARY 1-31), WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 15, 1865.--#7)
 
 
Organization of the Infantry and Cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, C. S. Army, commanding, February 28, 1865
 
CAVALRY CORPS.
WILLIAM H. F. LEE'S DIVISION.-Maj. Gen. WILLIAM H. F. LEE.
Dearing''s Brigade.-Brig. Gen. JAMES DEARING.
 
8th Georgia, Col. Joel R. Griffin.
4th North Carolina, Col. Dennis D. Ferebee.
16th North Carolina Battalion, Lieut. Col. Thomas Boyd Edelin.
Graham's (Virginia) Battery, Capt. Edward Graham.
(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/2 [S# 96] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA (JANUARY 1-31), WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 15, 1865.--#1)
 
 
Brevet Major-General WEBB, Chief of Staff: HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, March 22, 1865. (Received 9.45 a.m.)
I have to report all quiet in my front during yesterday and last night. Three deserters from Fourth North Carolina Cavalry were received last evening. They report all quiet in the rebel lines. Their regiment has been moved up to Hatcher's Run on picket duty. The Fourth North Carolina Cavalry belongs to Roberts' brigade, of Lee's division. It is composed of Fourth and Sixteenth North Carolina and Eighth Georgia Cavalry (the Eighth Georgia was recently sent to Raleigh), Graham's battery, four pieces, and Lyon's battery, four pieces. This brigade is about 650 strong, all told. Barringer's brigade of cavalry, about 1,000 strong, is near Stony Creek, and is the finest brigade they have. These men brought with them their arms and equipments and two horses. G. K. WARREN, Major-General, Commanding. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/3 [S# 97] UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM MARCH 16, 1865, TO JUNE 30, 1865.--#4)
 
 
Organization of troops in the Department of North Carolina, General Braxton Bragg, C. S. Army, commanding, January 31, 1865.
 
SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT.-Brig. Gen. LAWRENCE S. BAKER.
Second Sub-District, Kinston.-Lieut. Col. Rufus W. WHARTON.
 
67th North Carolina, Maj. Edward Whitford.
Provost Guard, Capt. Allen Croom.
8th Georgia Cavalry, Company G, Capt. Patrick Gray,
6th North Carolina Cavalry, Maj. John J. Spann.
13th Battalion Light Artillery, Lieut. Col. Joseph B. Starr.
(O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/2 [S# 96] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA (JANUARY 1-31), WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 15, 1865.--#7)
 
 
Organization of troops in the Department of North Carolina, Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke, C. S. Army, commanding, February 10, 1865.
 
SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT.-Brig. Gen. LAWRENCE S. BAKER.
Second Sub-District, Kinston.-Col. JOHN N. WHITFORD.
 
67th North Carolina, Lieut. Col. Rufus W. Wharton.
Provost Guard, Capt. Allen Croom.
8th Georgia Cavalry, Company G, Capt. Patrick Gray.
6th North Carolina Cavalry, Maj. John J. Spann.
13th North Carolina Battalion Light Artillery, Lieut. Col. Joseph B. Starr.
O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/2 [S# 99] CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA (FROM FEBRUARY 1), SOUTH CAROLINA, SOUTHERN GEORGIA, AND EAST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 23, 1865.--#8
 
 
 
2006 John Griffin